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Last edited by Charles Horn
January 28, 2012 | History

Sophocles

496 B.C. - 406 B.C.

Sophocles (circa. 496 BCE - 406 BCE) was the second of the three ancient Greek tragedians whose work has survived to the present day. His first plays were written later than those of Aeschylus, and earlier than those of Euripides. According to the Suda, a 10th century encyclopedia, Sophocles wrote 120 or more plays during the course of his life, but only seven have survived in a complete form, namely Ajax, Antigone, Trachinian Women, Oedipus the King, Electra, Philoctetes and Oedipus at Colonus. For almost 50 years, Sophocles was the most-awarded playwright in the dramatic competitions of ancient Athens that took place during the religious festivals of the Lenaea and the Dionysia. Sophocles competed in around thirty drama competitions; he won perhaps twenty four and never received lower than second place. Aeschylus won fourteen competitions and was defeated by Sophocles at times. Euripides won only four competitions.

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History Created April 1, 2008 · 12 revisions
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January 28, 2012 Edited by Charles Horn tidied other names section
January 28, 2012 Edited by Charles Horn Edited without comment.
May 13, 2011 Edited by Budelberger merge authors
May 12, 2011 Edited by Budelberger merge authors
April 1, 2008 Created by an anonymous user initial import