Cover of: How does analysis cure? | Heinz Kohut

About the Book

The Austro-American psychoanalyst Heinz Kohut was one of the foremost leaders in his field and developed the school of self-psychology, which sets aside the Freudian explanations for behavior and looks instead at self/object relationships and empathy in order to shed light on human behavior. In How Does Analysis Cure? Kohut presents the theoretical framework for self-psychology, and carefully lays out how the self develops over the course of time. Kohut also specifically defines healthy and unhealthy cases of Oedipal complexes and narcissism, while investigating the nature of analysis itself as treatment for pathologies. This in-depth examination of “the talking cure” explores the lesser studied phenomena of psychoanalysis, including when it is beneficial for analyses to be left unfinished, and the changing definition of “normal.”

An important work for working psychoanalysts, this book is important not only for psychologists, but also for anyone interested in the complex inner workings of the human psyche. [University of Chicago Press]

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. [229]-232.
Includes index.

Classifications

Dewey Decimal Class
616.89/17
Library of Congress
BF697 .K64 1984

The Physical Object

Pagination
xiii, 240 p. ;
Number of pages
240

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL3181435M
Internet Archive
howdoesanalysisc00kohurich
ISBN 10
0226450341
LC Control Number
83024090
Library Thing
460372
Goodreads
673446

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August 12, 2011 Edited by ImportBot add ia_box_id to scanned books
July 31, 2010 Edited by IdentifierBot added LibraryThing ID
May 5, 2010 Edited by ImportBot add scanned books from the Internet Archive
April 16, 2010 Edited by bgimpertBot Added goodreads ID.
April 1, 2008 Created by an anonymous user Initial record created, from Scriblio MARC record.