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July 19, 2017 | History

The Growth of Foreign Missions in The Mennonite Brethren Church 1 edition

Cover of: The Growth of Foreign Missions in The Mennonite Brethren Church | Gerhard W. Peters
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About the Book

This book is an account of the origin and growth of the foreign mission work of the Mennonite Brethren Church until 1947. It was commissioned by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Mennonite Brethren Church of North America. The book began as a doctoral dissertation written by Dr. Gerhard W. Peters, which he revised--at the request of the Board of Foreign Missions--to include two additional features in order to make the book more useful as a training manual for churches and schools. The two features were: a history of the origin and development of the Mennonite Brethren Church itself, and a background survey of the three primary Mennonite Brethren mission fields: India, China, and Congo. Both features were designed to give readers a better understanding of this particular missionary movement with its successes, challenges, and, at times, failures.

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The Growth of Foreign Missions in The Mennonite Brethren Church
by Gerhard W. Peters

Published 1952 by The Board of Foreign Missions, The Conference of the Mennonite Brethren Church of North America in Hillsboro, KS, USA .
Written in English.

Table of Contents

Biography of Author 9
Preface 11
Introduction 21
Part One: General Background: The Mennonite Brethren Church
I. The Origin of the Mennonite Brethren Church 27
1. The Document of Secession and the Confession of Faith 27
2. The Reasons for the Secession stated and analyzed 29
II. The Struggle for Existence and the Organization of the Mennonite Brethren Conference 34
III. The Justification of the Secession of the "Brethren" 35
1. The Answer from Church History 36
2. The Argumentative Answer 36
a. Theological Argument 36
b. Historical Argument 37
c. Missionary Argument 38
3. The Answer of another historian 39
IV. The Mennonite Brethren Church in North America 40
1. The unexpected change in the Russian Government toward the "Foreign Settlers" 40
2. The migration to America 40
3. The Organization of the Mennonite Brethren Church in North America 41
V. Specific Factors contributing toward the Awakening of Mission Interest in the Mennonite Brethren Church 43
1. The influences of the Moravian Brethren upon the Mennonites 43
2. The Circulation of Missionary Literature and occasional Visits by Foreign Missionaries 45
3. The Ministry of Pastor Edward Wuest, a Wuertemberg Pietist 46
4. The contacts with the Mennonites of Holland 47
5. The contacts with and the examples of the Baptists in Germany 49
Part Two: Foreign Missions in the Mennonite Brethren Church of South Russia
I. The Ministry of the Mennonite Brethren to their Neighbors 53
II. The Ministry of the Mennonite Brethren of Russia to the Telugus of "Deccan," India 55
1. The First Missionary Volunteer 55
2. The Choice of the Mission Field 56
a. Certain Determining Factors 56
b. The Choice of the Field 56
c. The Appointment of Mr. and Mrs. Friesen 58
d. The Forming of an Associated Mission 58
3. The Home organization of the "Brethren" for the Administration of Missions 60
4. The Field and its Development 61
a. Naigonda as an Out-station (1885-1890) 61
b. Naigonda as a Central Station (1890-1899) 62
c. The Division of the Naigonda Field (1899-1915) 65
+ Naigonda 65
+ Sooriapet 66
+ Bhonigir 67
+ Jangaon 67
5. Personnel of 1914 68
6. The Transfer of the Mission to the American Baptist Missionary Union 68
Part Three: Foreign Missions in the Mennonite Brethren Church of North America
I. The Growth of the Mission Interest and its Practical Expression 73
1. Small Beginnings -- the support of National Evangelists in the Baptist Mission in India and Cameroon (1884-1894) 73
2. The Struggle for an Independent Foreign Mission Enterprise 75
a. The Opening of a station among the Comanche Indians in Oklahoma (1887-1898) 75
b. The Crisis -- Conference of 1896 77
c. The Justification of the Desire for an Independent Mission 79
3. The Conference goes to India for Work (1897) 81
a. Why India 81
+ The sad fate of the missionaries in the Cameroon Field 81
+ The work of the Mennonite Brethren Church of Russia in India 82
+ The great Telugu revival in the American Baptist Mission Field 83
b. The first conference -- Missionaries for India 83
c. The great Disappointment and the Undaunted Conference 85
d. The Continued Flow 87
4. The Conference adds a China Field to its Responsibilities and sets itself to work (1919) 88
a. Early Contact with China through the China Mennonite Mission 88
b. A Critical Conference at Henderson, Nebraska, in 1909 1909
c. The Independent Going-forth of Mr. and Mrs. F.J. Wiens 90
d. The Conference assumes Responsibilities for the South China Mission work (1919- ) 91
e. The Conference sets itself to work 93
5. The Conference in its relation to Africa 93
a. The Independent work of Mr. and Mrs. A.A. Janzen at Kafumba, Belgian Congo 94
b. The Independent work of Mr. and Mrs. H.G. Bartsch at Bololo, Belgian Congo 96
c. The African Missionary Society 97
+ Its Origin 97
+ The Restoration and Incorporation of the Society 98
d. The Conference of 1939 at Corn, Oklahoma as related to the "African-Mission-Problem" 99
e. The Conference assumes responsibilities for both fields 101
6. The Conference extends its Sphere of Service to South America 104
a. Revival of Interest in South America 104
b. The Choice of Fields 105
II. The Growth of Mission Organization 107
1. The Growth of the Administrative Offices -- The Board of Foreign Missions 107
a. The Period of Orientation (1885-1896) 107
b. The Period of Stabilization (1896-1903) 109
c. The Period of direct Conference Administration (1903-1936) 111
d. The Period of Centralization (1936- ) 112
2. The Growth of the Treasury and the Endowment Fund 114
a. The General Treasury 115
b. The Special or Assigned Gifts Treasury 115
c. The Pension Treasury 116
d. The Endowment Fund 118
3. The Incorporation and the Growth of the Constitution as related to Foreign Missions 122
a. The Charter and By-laws of the American Mennonite Brethren Mission Union of 1900 122
b. The Revision of the By-laws in 1903 123
c. The Amendment to the Charter and the Constitution of 1909 124
d. The Constitution of 1936 125
4. The Foreign Missionary 126
a. The Qualifications 126
b. The Appointment 127
c. The Term of Service 128
d. The Care of the Children 128
e. The Position in Mission Administration 129
f. Withdrawal or Retiring 129
Part Four: The Main Foreign Mission Fields of the Mennonite Brethren Church of North America
I. The Telugu Field of South India 134
1. General Features of the Telingana 134
a. The Geographical Background 134
+ Location and Siza 134
+ Topography 135
+ Climate 135
+ Products 136
b. The Anthropological Background 137
+ Theories of their Racial Origin 137
+ Their physical Characteristics 138
+ Their Social Life 138
c. Religious Background 142
+ Defining area 142
+ Dravidian Hinduism 143
+ Major Religious Concepts 146
2. Missions to the Telugu People 149
a. The Danish-Halle Tranquabar Mission 149
b. The London Missionary Society 152
c. The American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 154
d. The Lutheran Missions 157
+ The Evangelical Lutheran Church of America Mission 157
+ The American Lutheran Church Mission 158
e. The Church England Missions 159
+ The Church Missionary Society 159
+ The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts 160
+ The Paskal Mission 162
f. The Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society 162
g. The Methodist Episcopal Church Mission 163
h. Other Missions 164
3. The Mission of the Mennonite Brethren Church of North America to the Telugus 165
a. Specifications of the Field 165
b. The Founding of the Mission 166
c. The Growth of the Work 172
+ Nagarkurnool 172
+ Wanaparty 173
+ Hughestown 176
+ Shamshabad 179
+ Deverakonda 180
+ Kalva-Kurty 184
+ Janumpet 186
+ Mahbubnagar 187
+ Gadwal 189
d. Methods of Work 191
+ Evangelism 191
+ Church Planting 193
+ Institutional Work 196
++ Christian Education 196
++ Medical Work 201
+ Literary and Industrial Work 203
e. The Indianization of the Work 204
f. The Missionary Conference and Rest Home 207
+ The Missionary Conference 206
+ The Missionary Rest Homes 207
II. The Hakka Field of South China 208
1. The Hakka People 208
a. Their Origin and History 208
b. Their Location and Occupation 212
c. Their Characteristics 213
d. Their Religious Background 215
+ Confucianism 215
+ Taoism 216
+ Buddism 217
+ Popular Religion 220
2. Missions to Hakkas 227
a. The Berlin Missionary Society 227
b. The Basel Evangelical Missionary Society 227
c. Other Missions 228
3. The Mission of the Mennonite Brethren Church of North America to the Hakkas 229
a. Specifications of the Field 229
b. Founding of the Mission 229
+ Initial Preparations of the Missionaries 230
+ Seven Years of Lonely yet Energetic and Expanded Labors (1913-1920) 232
c. The Development of the Work 235
+ The Action of the Home Conference in 1919 235
+ The Growth of the Personnel 235
+ The Reorganization of the Shonghong Work 235
+ The Opening of Eng Teng Mission Station 236
d. The Decline of the Mission 237
+ The Failure to Reinforce the Depleted Staff 237
+ The Revolutionary War of 1927 and After 238
e. The Indigenization of the Mission 239
+ The Organization of an Indigenous Conference 239
+ The Ordination of a National Ministry 240
f. The Re-assumption of the Mission 240
g. The Hakka Church Weathers the Storm 242
h. The Hakka Mission in Swatow 243
i. A Visit to the Hakka of Borneo 244
III. The Belgian Congo Mission Fields 245
1. General Features of Belgian Congo 245
a. Position and Area 245
b. Physical Divisions 245
c. Botanical Divisions 246
d. Atmospheric Divisions 246
e. Natural Resources 246
f. The Fauna 247
g. Inhabitants 248
h. Modern Political History 251
2. Religious Background 252
a. Religious Concepts 252
+ Theism 252
+ Spiritism 253
+ Dynamism 254
+ Survival after Death 254
b. Religious Practices 255
+ Religious Functionaries 255
+ Objects of Protection 257
+ Personal Acts of Worship 258
3. Protestant Missions 259
a. The Baptist Missionary Society 259
b. The Livingstone Inland Mission and the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 260
c. The Swedish Missionary Union 261
d. The Congo-Bololo Mission 261
e. The Christian and Missionary Alliance 261
f. The American Presbyterian Congo Mission 261
g. The Disciples of Christ Congo Mission 262
h. Other Missions 262
4. Summary of Protestant Work 263
5. The Mennonite Brethren Church of North America Mission to Congo 264
a. The Kafumba Mission 265
+ Specifications of the Field 265
++ Location and Size of the Field 265
++The Geography of the Field 265
++ The People of the Field 266
+ The History of the Mission Work 267
++ The Founding of the Mission 267
++ The Growth of the Personnel 270
+ The Methods of the Work 272
++ Evangelism 272
++ Education 272
++ Literary Work 273
++ Medical Work 274
++ Industrial Work 275
b. Bololo Mission 275
+ Specifications of the Field 275
++ Location and Size of the Field 275
++ The Geography and Climate of the Field 276
++ The People of the Field 276
+ The History of the Mission Work 277
++ The Founding of the Mission 277
++ Pioneer Hardships and Problems 278
+++ Outer Developments 278
+++ Inner Developments 280
Part Five: Concluding Remarks 285
Appendix A
Charter 288
Petition for Amendment 290
Constitution of 1900 292
By-Laws of 1909 Constitution 295
By-Laws of 1936 Constitution 297
Appendix B
Principles for the Extension of Mission Work 302
Appendix C
Constitution of the American Mennonite Brethren Mission Conference, India 305
Draft of a Proposed Constitution of the Field Council of the Andhra Mennonite Brethren Church and the American Mennonite Brethren Mission 307
Die Mission in China 308
Missionsarbeit in Afrika 310
Appendix D
Mission Personnel 312
Appendix E
Mission Treasury Report 316
Bibliography 318

Edition Notes


Copyright Date
1952

The Physical Object

Format
Paperback
Pagination
327p.
Number of pages
335
Dimensions
9.0 x 5.6 x 0.5 inches

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL26353381M
Internet Archive
TheGrowthOfForeignMissionsOCRopt
OCLC/WorldCat
1301625

History

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July 19, 2017 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
July 19, 2017 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
July 19, 2017 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
July 19, 2017 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
July 18, 2017 Created by Jon Isaak Added new book.