Cover of: Mennonites in the Cities of Imperial Russia: Volume Two by by Helmut T. Huebert

Download Options

Buy this book

Last edited by Jon Isaak
March 27, 2019 | History

Mennonites in the Cities of Imperial Russia: Volume Two

  • 0 Ratings
  • 0 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading
  • 0 Have read

This edition was published in by Springfield Publishers in Winnipeg, Canada.

Written in English

441 pages

When the Mennonites first migrated from Prussia to South Russia in 1789 to form the Chortitza Colony, then again in 1804 to establish the Molotschna Colony, they moved onto the land. They were not all originally farmers in Prussia, and for that matter, they were not all good farmers in Russia, but forming closed, farm villages seemed most likely to allow them to control their own destiny in the new home land.... Mennonites were eventually found in most cities of Imperial Russia--in some capacity or other.... This present book...is meant to be a source of specific information, largely about individuals....

The typical city chapter includes a brief history of the city, with its historical significance and Mennonite connections being featured, followed by maps of the city and the surrounding area and some pictures of the city itself. Then comes a list of every Mennonite known to have lived or stayed in that city, including information such as date of birth, parents, children and major events in the life of the person. Mennonite institutions, events and businesses are listed, including pictures where available.... There is a personal name index of those who lived in the cities at the back of the book.

~Helmut T. Huebert, from the Preface

Read more

Previews available in: English

Edition Availability
Cover of: Mennonites in the Cities of Imperial Russia: Volume Two
Mennonites in the Cities of Imperial Russia: Volume Two
2008, Springfield Publishers
Paperback in English

Add another edition?

Mennonites in the Cities of Imperial Russia

Volume Two

First published in 2008



Work Description

When the Mennonites first migrated from Prussia to South Russia in 1789 to form the Chortitza Colony, then again in 1804 to establish the Molotschna Colony, they moved onto the land. They were not all originally farmers in Prussia, and for that matter, they were not all good farmers in Russia, but forming closed, farm villages seemed most likely to allow them to control their own destiny in the new home land.... Mennonites were eventually found in most cities of Imperial Russia--in some capacity or other.... This present book...is meant to be a source of specific information, largely about individuals....

The typical city chapter includes a brief history of the city, with its historical significance and Mennonite connections being featured, followed by maps of the city and the surrounding area and some pictures of the city itself. Then comes a list of every Mennonite known to have lived or stayed in that city, including information such as date of birth, parents, children and major events in the life of the person. Mennonite institutions, events and businesses are listed, including pictures where available.... There is a personal name index of those who lived in the cities at the back of the book.

~Helmut T. Huebert, from the Preface

Links outside Open Library

Mennonites in the Cities of Imperial Russia: Volume Two

This edition was published in by Springfield Publishers in Winnipeg, Canada.


Table of Contents

Preface v
Table of Contents vii
Map: European Russia viii
1. Alexandrovsk/Zaporozhye 1
David Johann Klassen (1899-1990) 55
2. Ekaterinoslav/Dnepropetovsk 88
David Heinrich Epp (1861-1934) 160
Johann Jakob Esau (1859-1940) 163
Peter Heinrich Heese (1852-1911) 170
Dietrich Kornelius Thiessen (1870-1937) 173
Johann Heinrich Toews (1841-1915) 176
3. Kharkov 182
4. Moscow 209
Johann Johann Toews (1878-1973) 266
Jakob Aron Rempel (1833-1941) 269
Heinrich Heinrich Funk (1880-1941?) 274
Peter Franz Froese (1882-1957) 278
Cornelius Franz Klassen (1894-1954) 286
5. Nikopol 293
6. Odessa 314
7. Omsk 337
8. St. Petersburg/Leningrad 354
9 Tokmak 388
Index 417

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Copyright Date
2008

The Physical Object

Format
Paperback
Pagination
viii, 430p
Number of pages
441
Dimensions
11 x 8 x 1 inches

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL26810688M
Internet Archive
MennonitesInTheCitiesOfImperialRussiaVolTwoOCRopt
ISBN 10
0920643124
OCLC/WorldCat
823218587

Lists containing this Book

History

Download catalog record: RDF / JSON / OPDS | Wikipedia citation
March 27, 2019 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
March 27, 2019 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
March 27, 2019 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
March 26, 2019 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
March 26, 2019 Created by Jon Isaak Added new book.