Cover of: Mennonites in the Cities of Imperial Russia: Volume One by Helmut T. Huebert

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December 17, 2020 | History

Mennonites in the Cities of Imperial Russia: Volume One

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This edition was published in by Springfield Publishers in Winnipeg.

Written in English

467 pages

When the Mennonites first migrated from Prussia to South Russia in 1789 to form the Chortitza Colony, then again in 1804 to establish the Molotschna Colony, they moved onto the land. They were not all originally farmers in Prussia, and for that matter, they were not all good farmers in Russia, but forming closed, farm villages seemed most likely to allow them to control their own destiny in the new home land.... Mennonites were eventually found in most cities of Imperial Russia--in some capacity or other.... This present book...is meant to be a source of specific information, largely about individuals....

The typical city chapter includes a brief history of the city, with its historical significance and Mennonite connections being featured, followed by maps of the city and the surrounding area and some pictures of the city itself. Then comes a list of every Mennonite known to have lived or stayed in that city, including information such as date of birth, parents, children and major events in the life of the person. Mennonite institutions, events and businesses are listed, including pictures where available.... There is a personal name index of those who lived in the cities at the back of the book.

~Helmut T. Huebert, from the Preface

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Cover of: Mennonites in the Cities of Imperial Russia: Volume One
Mennonites in the Cities of Imperial Russia: Volume One
2006, Springfield Publishers
Paperback in English

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Mennonites in the Cities of Imperial Russia

Volume One

First published in 2006



Work Description

When the Mennonites first migrated from Prussia to South Russia in 1789 to form the Chortitza Colony, then again in 1804 to establish the Molotschna Colony, they moved onto the land. They were not all originally farmers in Prussia, and for that matter, they were not all good farmers in Russia, but forming closed, farm villages seemed most likely to allow them to control their own destiny in the new home land.... Mennonites were eventually found in most cities of Imperial Russia--in some capacity or other.... This present book...is meant to be a source of specific information, largely about individuals....

The typical city chapter includes a brief history of the city, with its historical significance and Mennonite connections being featured, followed by maps of the city and the surrounding area and some pictures of the city itself. Then comes a list of every Mennonite known to have lived or stayed in that city, including information such as date of birth, parents, children and major events in the life of the person. Mennonite institutions, events and businesses are listed, including pictures where available.... There is a personal name index of those who lived in the cities at the back of the book.

~Helmut T. Huebert, from the Preface

Links outside Open Library

Mennonites in the Cities of Imperial Russia: Volume One

This edition was published in by Springfield Publishers in Winnipeg.


Table of Contents

Preface v
Table of Contents vii
Map: South Russia viii
1. Barvenkovo 1
Abraham Heinrich Unruh (1878-1961) 43
2. Berdyansk 52
Kornelius Janzen 182
Leonard Isaak Suderman 193
Heinrich Ediger and Alexander Ediger 203
3. Melitopol 219
4. Millerovo 257
Wilhelm Isaak Dyck 318
Cornelius Abram DeFehr 329
Kornelius Jacob Martens and Maria (nee Dyck) Martens 339
5. Orechov 355
6. Pologi 374
7. Sevastopol 386
Peter Martinovitch Friesen 396
8. Simferopol 408
Index 438

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Genre
Registers., Biography., Genealogy.
Copyright Date
2006

Classifications

Library of Congress
BX8119.R8 H84 2006

The Physical Object

Format
Paperback
Pagination
viii, 456p
Number of pages
467
Dimensions
11 x 8 x 1 inches

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL19398300M
Internet Archive
MennonitesInTheCitiesOfImperialRussiaVolOneOCRopt
ISBN 10
0920643108
LC Control Number
2007367640
OCLC/WorldCat
71243495

Lists containing this Book

History

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December 17, 2020 Edited by Clean Up Bot import existing book
March 27, 2019 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
March 27, 2019 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
March 26, 2019 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
October 22, 2008 Created by ImportBot Imported from University of Toronto MARC record.