Cover of: Mennonite Estates in Imperial Russia, 2nd ed. by Helmut Huebert

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December 12, 2020 | History

Mennonite Estates in Imperial Russia, 2nd ed.

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This edition was published in by Springfield Publishers in Winnipeg, Canada.

Written in English

479 pages

This book is an index of Mennonite estates in Imperial Russia from 1813 to about 1920. It does not explain all the intricacies of the development of each estate. Furthermore, it is a study of something which has disappeared almost a century ago. Some have decrepit buildings remaining, but of many estates there is now nothing left except open fields.

When the first Mennonite settlers migrated from Prussia to southern Russia in 1789, they were restricted from purchasing land outside the land (i.e, colony or settlement) allocated to them. However, in 1817, this restriction was lifted, opening the way for enterprising people to expand their holdings. Thus, Mennonite estates became possible.

Some estates were very large, with elaborate well-appointed manor houses; they were commonly surrounded by formal gardens. They often employed a large number of people, most from the surrounding Ukrainian or Russian population. This index lists 1,220 such estates by 1914.

During the First World War, the Mennonite people's "German affiliation" brought fear, especially among many of the pan-Slavic nationalists--that the estate owners could control the economy of south Russia. This resulted in the formalization of legal measures to expropriate all land belonging to "enemy aliens." Mennonites were included in this category. After the Revolution of 1917 and the Civil War, the entire Mennonite population suffered, but especially the estate owners. A considerable number were murdered outright.

The estate lands and buildings were among the first to be "nationalized." This often meant that the buildings were first ransacked, then often completely destroyed by roving gangs of bandits.

Today, of the estate buildings that remain, many are now abandoned derelicts, although a few serve some other functions such as homes for orphans or veterans. Most estates, however, are memories only, empty spaces or fields that, nevertheless, still bear witness to those who lived and worked and died there, many years ago.

~Helmut T. Huebert, from the Overview and Introduction

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Cover of: Mennonite Estates in Imperial Russia, 2nd ed.
Mennonite Estates in Imperial Russia, 2nd ed.
2008, Springfield Publishers
Paperback in English

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Mennonite Estates in Imperial Russia, 2nd ed.

First published in 2008



Work Description

This book is an index of Mennonite estates in Imperial Russia from 1813 to about 1920. It does not explain all the intricacies of the development of each estate. Furthermore, it is a study of something which has disappeared almost a century ago. Some have decrepit buildings remaining, but of many estates there is now nothing left except open fields.

When the first Mennonite settlers migrated from Prussia to southern Russia in 1789, they were restricted from purchasing land outside the land (i.e, colony or settlement) allocated to them. However, in 1817, this restriction was lifted, opening the way for enterprising people to expand their holdings. Thus, Mennonite estates became possible.

Some estates were very large, with elaborate well-appointed manor houses; they were commonly surrounded by formal gardens. They often employed a large number of people, most from the surrounding Ukrainian or Russian population. This index lists 1,220 such estates by 1914.

During the First World War, the Mennonite people's "German affiliation" brought fear, especially among many of the pan-Slavic nationalists--that the estate owners could control the economy of south Russia. This resulted in the formalization of legal measures to expropriate all land belonging to "enemy aliens." Mennonites were included in this category. After the Revolution of 1917 and the Civil War, the entire Mennonite population suffered, but especially the estate owners. A considerable number were murdered outright.

The estate lands and buildings were among the first to be "nationalized." This often meant that the buildings were first ransacked, then often completely destroyed by roving gangs of bandits.

Today, of the estate buildings that remain, many are now abandoned derelicts, although a few serve some other functions such as homes for orphans or veterans. Most estates, however, are memories only, empty spaces or fields that, nevertheless, still bear witness to those who lived and worked and died there, many years ago.

~Helmut T. Huebert, from the Overview and Introduction

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Mennonite Estates in Imperial Russia, 2nd ed.

This edition was published in by Springfield Publishers in Winnipeg, Canada.


Table of Contents

Introduction v
A Brief Overview vii
Sources ix
Table of Contents xii
Map: Mennonite Colonies and Estates in South Russia xvi
List of Mennonite Estates in Imperial Russia 1
List of Mennonite Estate Owners 252
List of Mennonite Estate Managers 291
List of Teachers on Mennonite Estates 292
Biographies of a number of Mennonite Estate Owners 294
Maps of Estates and Regions 340
Pictures of Estates 406
Chortitza (Old Colony) Renters on Estates in 1852 456
Mini-Revolution of 1905-1906 456
Weights and measures 457
Czars (Tsars) of Russia During the Mennonite Period 458
Russo-Turkish Wars 458
Dates and calendars 459
About the producer of this index 460

Edition Notes

Genre
Genealogy.
Copyright Date
2008

Classifications

Library of Congress
DK34.M39 H84 2005

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL3460441M
Internet Archive
mennoniteestatesinimperialrussia2ndeditionocropt
ISBN 10
0920643094
LC Control Number
2005412298
OCLC/WorldCat
57392979
Goodreads
3858120

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December 12, 2020 Edited by Clean Up Bot import existing book
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July 10, 2019 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
July 10, 2019 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
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