Click here to skip to this page's main content.

New to the Open Library? — Learn how it works
Want to support Open Library? Until April 30, we'll double your donation! Help us build the great digital library.
Last edited by Open Library Bot
December 3, 2010 | History

Public perceptions of the Queensland Police Service 1 edition

Public perceptions of the Queensland Police Service
Kelly Ede

No ebook available.


Buy

Add an ISBN to link to booksellers

D'oh. There's no description for this book yet. Can you help?
There is only 1 edition record, so we'll show it here...  •  Add edition?

Public perceptions of the Queensland Police Service
findings from the 2002 Public Attitudes Survey
Kelly Ede.

Published 2003 by Crime and Misconduct Commission in Brisbane, Qld .
Written in English.

About the Book

This report presents findings regarding public perceptions of the Queensland Police Service (Australia) obtained from the 2002 Public Attitudes Survey. The 2002 Public Attitudes Survey was the fifth in a series of telephone surveys of Queensland residents. The focus of the survey is the measurement of public attitudes toward the Queensland Police Service (QPS), as well as public knowledge, confidence, and experiences regarding the complaints process. The survey found that most people in Queensland had a positive view of the QPS. Younger respondents, ages 18 to 24, were significantly more likely than other groups to express negative views of the police and to report dissatisfaction with their treatment by police. The police image continues to improve, as 90 percent of respondents reported a belief that most police are honest and behave well. The proportion of people who reported dissatisfaction with the QPS continued to decline in 2002. Ten percent of the respondents actually made or attempted to make an official complaint against police. For those who felt like complaining but did not, the most common reasons were a belief that it would not do any good or that they did not know how to make an official complaint. General public confidence in the complaints process remains reasonably high, although there has been a decline since 1995. Most respondents favored the use of an independent body to investigate complaints against police officers.

Table of Contents

Key findings
Background
Structure of the report
Part A. Methodology
Part B. Perceptions of police behaviour
Part C. The complaints process
Summary
Conclusion.

Edition Notes

"February 2003."

Series
Public perceptions series

The Physical Object

Pagination
24 p. :
Number of pages
24

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL19110480M

History Created December 11, 2009 · 3 revisions Download catalog record: RDF / JSON

December 3, 2010 Edited by Open Library Bot Added subjects from MARC records.
January 24, 2010 Edited by WorkBot add more information to works
December 11, 2009 Created by WorkBot add works page