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The hidden life of Jesus
Henri-Marie Boudon, Edward Hea ...

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The hidden life of Jesus
a lesson and model to Christians
3d ed.
translated from the French of Henri-Marie Boudon by Edward Healy Thompson.

Published 1869 by Burns & Oates, Catholic Publication Society Co. in London, New York .
Written in English.

Table of Contents

CONTENTS.
ADVERTISEMENT page y
DEDICATION TO THE HOLY FAMILY. Xii
DEDICATION TO THE HOLY BISHOPS OF THE DIOCESE OF EVREUX
PART I.
CHAPTER I.
JESUS HIDDEN IN HIS GENERAL SELF-ANNIHILATION.
Jesus hidden as He is God. God everywhere present, yet everywhere forgotten and ignored. Creatures alone re- garded ; the Creator disregarded and offended. How little fear of His Divine Majesty even among Christians and Catholics. Jesus hidden as He is man; whilst men delight in display page 3
CHAPTER II.
JESUS HIDDEN AS TO HIS GENERATION — ETERNAL AND TEMPORAL.
The value set upon birth, and rank, and state in the world ; and that even by ecclesiastics. Contrast : the Crib of Bethlehem. Christians the disciples of the carpenter's Son page 10
CHAPTER III.
JESUS HIDDEN AS TO HIS NATURAL QUALITIES.
His natural gifts sublime, yet concealed. Father De Condren's answer when urged to write. The Gospels and their writers. Our Lord's teaching by parables a lesson to the learned and the intellectual. His concealment of His personal beauty a warning to the vain and self-com- placent. His withdrawal of His sensible presence from His disoiples contrasted with men's desire to display their natural advantages; and that even in the churches. page 14
CHAPTER IV.
JESUS HIDDEN IN HIS PRIVATION OF TEMPORAL GOODS.
Jesus the King of kings, yet the poorest man on earth. Fruits of this poverty in the hearts of His followers. Advant- ages of compulsory over voluntary poverty. It admits to a deeper participation in the abject life of Jesus. Is more contemptible in the eyes of men. Devout people them- selves ashamed of it page 20
CHAPTER V.
JESUS HIDDEN IN HIS PRIVATION OF THE ESTEEM AND FRIENDSHIP OF CREATURES.
Creatures engrossed with creatures. Desire of their esteem and approbation strong in us to the last. How nature predominates in the intercourse even of the good and devout. Jesus our model. His extreme and ntter privations page 24
CHAPTER VI.
JESUS HIDDEN IN IGNOMINIES.
Nothing conceals more than contempt and disgrace. Loss of reputation a mark of God's love to us. A sure way of sharing the hidden life of Jesus. His treatment at the hands of men. Contrast of our pride and love of exaltation. page 27
CHAPTER VII.
JESUS HIDDEN AS TO HIS POWER.
The ordinary conduct of Christians wholly opposed to that of Jesus. He who is All makes Himself nothing ; and we who are nothing are always desiring to be something. His weakness apparently extreme. His refusal to exhibit His power. Our exceeding weakness contrasted with our self-importance page 31
CHAPTER VIII.
JESUS HIDDEN AS TO HIS OFFICES AND DIGNITIES.
Jesus a bishop. But a bishop without honour. Comparison of St. Martin of Tours. The episcopate of Jesus glorious, yet discharged amid poverty, contempt, and suffering. He assumed not the office to Himself: yet men seek ecclesiastical benefices and dignities for themselves and their relatives ; and that without regard to a divine vocation. The sin and misery of this page 35
CHAPTER IX.
JESUS HIDDEN AS TO HIS GRACES.
Jesus always enjoyed the beatific vision, yet never allowed its glory to appear ; except once, and then in secret. So also with respect to the hypostatic union. The lesson to be derived from this; especially by directors. Particular saints have been divinely moved to speak of the graces they have received ; but generally saints have laboured to conceal them. Hence the comparatively slight knowledge we possess of the marvels wrought in their souls. The duty, nevertheless, of being unreserved with our director. page 48
CHAPTER X.
JESUS HIDDEN AS TO HIS DIVINE MISSION.
That mission most exalted. Yet performed amidst circum- stances of the utmost ignominy ; and without any striking effects. His Apostles do greater things than Hot How confounding this to preachers who love display and look for success. They who truly have the Spirit of God shrink from attracting notice to themselves, and have a dread of worldly distinction. They abandon to God the success of what they do, and maintain a perfect indiffer- ence as to results. The thought of Jesus hidden destroys all selfish aims. Example of John the Baptist. They who truly have the Spirit of God endeavour to prevent any credit accruing to themselves from their labours. The blessedness of being disregarded and contemned by men. This grace bestowed sometimes on spiritual directors whom God uses for His secret purposes ; and on certain souls destined to serve as victims to divine justice. Conduct of Father De Condren page 47
CHAPTER XI.
JESUS HIDDEN EVEN WHEN MOST SEEN.
His predilection for the hidden life ; as shown in His conduct on Mount Thabor. His preaching rejected with scorn. The lesson this gives to those who desire the esteem of men. Jesus everywhere contemned and ill-treated. page 57
CHAPTER XII.
JESUS HIDDEN IN HIS GLORIOUS LIFE.
The creature disputes pre-eminence with its Creator. Men are ever seeking to be noticed. The self-annihilation of Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. His presence denied by heretics. Irreverence in churches page 61
CHAPTER XIII.
JESUS HIDDEN IN HIS MOST HOLY MOTHER AND HIS SAINTS.
How He humiliates Himself in everything that concerns or belongs to Him ; while creatures exalt themselves. Profanations in domestic chapels. Jesus despised on account of the poverty of Mary and Joseph. The pride of birth. Jesus hidden in His religion. How few appreciate His holiest maxims. People ashamed of being devout. What devotion is in itself. In what the practice of devotion consists. The indifference and cowardice of men in God's behalf. Ridicule of devotion the height of folly. The failings of the devout no disparagement to devotion. Jesus hidden in His servants page 68
A PRAYER TO THE HOLY SPIRIT 89
A PRAYER TO THE MOST HOLY AND EVER-IMMACULATE VIRGIN - MOTHER, MOST WORTHY SPOUSE OF THE HOLY SPIRIT 90
PART II.
CHAPTER I.
THE HIGH ESTEEM WE OUGHT TO HAVE OF THE HIDDEN LIFE.
Its advantages and excellencies can never be adequately expressed. A momentary illumination on the subject granted to a certain soul. God bestows His greatest graces on those whose life is most hidden. This truth exemplified in holy solitaries. Instances in the Old Testament. Christians called to be one with God. Joy the effect of this divine union. The glory which accrues to God from the hidden life. How good deeds are marred by admixture of self-love. The benefits which accrue to men from the hidden life. The hindrances whioh love of self and of creatures interposes ; and the evils it causes. The soul that loves God purely, desires only what God wills. The power which such souls have with God, and the graces and mercies He bestows on men for their sake. Instance of this in Sister Marie de Valence. The esteem whioh our Incarnate God had of the hidden life. The highest saints they whose life is least known to men. page 93
CHAPTER II.
WE OUGHT TO GIVE OUR AFFECTIONS TO THE HIDDEN LIFE WITH COURAGE AND FIDELITY.
Different ways of embracing the hidden life. The love of it, how far essential. Rules for its practice in religion ; and in the world. The atmosphere of the world infectious. Its injurious effects on the spirit of piety. Conduct of Father John Chrysostom. Father Bagot : three remarkable traits in his character and conduct. His spiritual children. The love of the hidden life exemplified in the saints : e.g., the Venerable Mary Magdalen of St. Joseph; St. Ignatius; St. Simeon Salus ; and others page 115
CHAPTEE III.
WE OUGHT TO COMBAT IN A CHRISTIAN WAT THE INCLINATION WE HAVE TO SELF-DISPLAY.
Jesus for thirty years in the workshop of a carpenter. The lesson this teaches us. How self-love cloaks itself with a zeal for the glory of God. Remedies against its artifices in the example of our Lord. He abstained from per- forming numberless good works because such was not the order of His Father. We must beware of that eagerness which springs from natural activity. Our Lord's example teaches us not to be eager to perform even those things which God requires of us. Instance from the writer's own experience. An inclination to self-display taints most of our actions page 129
CHAPTEE IV.
WE OUGHT CAREFULLY TO AVOID EVERYTHING THAT CAN MINISTER TO SELF-DISPLAY.
The conduct of our Divine Lord. Examples of St. Gregory and Father De Condren. We must shun praise and applause. Self-love no longer active in good works when left unnoticed by the world. Aversion of holy souls for anything tending to self -display. Examples of Father De Condren and Father Mataincourt. Saints have commonly kept strict silence on the subject of their graces. Illustration from our Lord's conduct on Thabor. The Gospel exhorts us to do our good works in secret. Jesus con- summated His greatest work by an ignominious death. page 137
CHAPTER V.
WE OUGHT TO OBSERVE A CONSTANT WATCHFULNESS OVER OURSELVES BY THE FAITHFUL PRACTICE OF MORTIFICATION IN THOSE SITUATIONS WHEREIN BY THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD WE ARE OBLIGED TO PUT OURSELVES FORWARD.
It is more easy to decline honours than to accept them and exclude self-love. The esteem of men the opposite to what our Lord promised His disciples. They who are called to fill high offices must beware of being actuated by human motives. They must consider the dangers of their exalted state ; and how God has accomplished His greatest designs by means of the poor and humble. They must walk therein with fear and dread. They mast have a simple regard to the will of God. They must not go beyond the bounds which God has set them. They must avoid self -display. They must war continually against the inclination thereto. The blessedness of being misrepresented and maligned page 145
CHAPTER VI.
WE OUGHT TO PRACTISE MUCH SELF-HUMILIATION, AND ENDURE WITH RELUCTANCE THE ESTEEM AND FRIENDSHIP OF CREATURES.
The friendship of the world afflicting to the Christian heart. The difficulty of being well off here and hereafter. Jesus rejected by men. The ardent desire which saints have shown to be despised by creatures; instanced in Father John Chrysostom, St. John of the Cross, St. Alexis. How they ought to humble themselves who are favoured with natural advantages page 155
CHAPTER VII.
WE OUGHT TO REJOICE GREATLY IN BEING UNKNOWN.
The happiness of the hidden life. It is a precious grace not to be esteemed by the world, but to be slighted and contemned. It is a still higher grace to be Blandered and defamed. The truth of this exemplified in the Blessed Henry Suso; and supremely in our Divine Saviour. page 160
CHAPTER VIII.
WE OUGHT TO MAKE A HOLY USE OF THE INTERIOR SUFFERINGS WHICH HIDE US FROM OURSELVES.
The effect of such interior pains in entirely hiding those who endure them. The purity which sufferings produce in the soul. Their nature and effects described. Self- contemplation, how dangerous. The blessedness of being deprived of all sensible consolations. The heaviest crosses the greatest favours. Our Lord tempted by the devil. Pretexts of self-love. Example of the Prophet Elias page 165
CHAPTER X.
WE OUGHT TO LIVE AS IP THERE WERE BUT GOD ONLY AND OURSELVES IN THE WORLD.
God the great All, and everything else nothing. This truth little realized. The miserable consequences of this ; even amongst the spiritually-minded. The necessity of giving heed to the light of pure faith. The illuminations it produces in the soul. A soul so enlightened refuses all satisfactions to self-love even of the holiest kind. Our Lord's withdrawal of His sensible presence from His Apostles. The most effectual means of detachment, to live as if there were but God and ourselves in the world. The blessed effects of this. The vanity of all created things page 171
CHAPTER X.
WE OUGHT TO HAVE A SPECIAL DEVOTION TO THE HOLY FAMILY OF OUR LORD, TO THE HOLY ANGELS, AND TO ALL THOSE SAINTS WHO HAVE BEEN ESPECIALLY CONNECTED WITH THE HIDDEN LIPE OF THE ADORABLE SAVIOUR.
Mary and Joseph the creatures most loved by Jesus; and them it is He calls to share most largely in the privations of His hidden life. How completely Mary hid herself, her virtues, and her prerogatives from the knowledge and esteem of men. The life of St. Joseph, how little known. Our Lord seems to delight in withdrawing him from view. The devotion due to St. John the Baptist, and other saints who led a solitary life, or who were despised and ill-treated by the world. They who are devout to the Hidden life ought to have a special devotion to the holy angels who ministered thereto page 180
A PRAYER TO THE HOLY SPIRIT 188
A PRAYER TO THE MOST HOLY MOTHER OF GOD 188

Edition Notes

Preface dated 1869.

Publisher's advertisements follow on 16 numbered pages at end.

Includes bibliographical references.

c.1: 99/00 0841R.

Genre
Early works to 1800.

The Physical Object

Pagination
xxxii, 182, 16 p. ;
Number of pages
182

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL18286330M
Internet Archive
TheHiddenLifeOfJesus
OCLC/WorldCat
44157315

History Created December 11, 2009 · 3 revisions Download catalog record: RDF / JSON

March 16, 2016 Edited by ww2archive added book
January 21, 2010 Edited by WorkBot add subjects and covers
December 11, 2009 Created by WorkBot add works page