Cover of: Grammar, Gesture, and Meaning in American Sign Language by Scott K. Liddell
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April 6, 2014 | History

Grammar, Gesture, and Meaning in American Sign Language

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This edition was published in by Cambridge University Press

Written in English

398 pages

In sign languages of the deaf some signs can meaningfully point toward things or can be meaningfully placed in the space ahead of the signer. This obligatory part of fluent grammatical signing has no parallel in vocally produced languages. This book focuses on American Sign Language to examine the grammatical and conceptual purposes served by these directional signs. It guides the reader through ASL grammar, the different categories of directional signs, the types of spatial representations signs are directed toward, how such spatial conceptions can be represented in mental space theory, and the conceptual purposes served by these signs. The book demonstrates a remarkable integration of grammar and gesture in the service of constructing meaning. These results also suggest that our concept of 'language' has been much too narrow and that a more comprehensive look at vocally produced languages will reveal the same integration of gestural, gradient, and symbolic elements.

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Previews available in: English

Edition Availability
Cover of: Grammar, Gesture, and Meaning in American Sign Language
Grammar, Gesture, and Meaning in American Sign Language
2003, Cambridge University Press
E-book in English
Cover of: Grammar, Gesture, and Meaning in American Sign Language
Grammar, Gesture, and Meaning in American Sign Language
March 31, 2003, Cambridge University Press
Hardcover in English
Cover of: Grammar, Gesture, and Meaning in American Sign Language
Grammar, Gesture, and Meaning in American Sign Language
March 24, 2003, Cambridge University Press
Paperback in English

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Grammar, Gesture, and Meaning in American Sign Language

First published in 2003



Work Description

In sign languages of the deaf some signs can meaningfully point toward things or can be meaningfully placed in the space ahead of the signer. This obligatory part of fluent grammatical signing has no parallel in vocally produced languages. This book focuses on American Sign Language to examine the grammatical and conceptual purposes served by these directional signs. It guides the reader through ASL grammar, the different categories of directional signs, the types of spatial representations signs are directed toward, how such spatial conceptions can be represented in mental space theory, and the conceptual purposes served by these signs. The book demonstrates a remarkable integration of grammar and gesture in the service of constructing meaning. These results also suggest that our concept of 'language' has been much too narrow and that a more comprehensive look at vocally produced languages will reveal the same integration of gestural, gradient, and symbolic elements.

Grammar, Gesture, and Meaning in American Sign Language

This edition was published in by Cambridge University Press


First Sentence

"Sign languages have developed spontaneously and independently within communities of Deaf users all over the world."

The Physical Object

Format
Paperback
Number of pages
398
Dimensions
8.9 x 6 x 1 inches
Weight
1.4 pounds

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL7713357M
ISBN 10
0521016509
ISBN 13
9780521016506
Library Thing
2093432
Goodreads
943302

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April 6, 2014 Edited by ImportBot Added IA ID.
August 6, 2010 Edited by IdentifierBot added LibraryThing ID
April 24, 2010 Edited by Open Library Bot Fixed duplicate goodreads IDs.
April 16, 2010 Edited by bgimpertBot Added goodreads ID.
April 29, 2008 Created by an anonymous user Imported from amazon.com record.