Cover of: Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany | Rogers Brubaker
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October 8, 2017 | History

Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany

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This edition published in by Harvard University Press

Written in English

284 pages

The state, wrote Aristotle, "is a compound made up of citizens; and this compels us to consider who should properly be called a citizen and what a citizen really is." These are the questions, with their broad implications for the modern nation-state, that Rogers Brubaker addresses here. In a time when the flow of information, capital, and immigration has blurred the definition of the state, Brubaker's sustained analysis of the origins and vicissitudes of citizenship in France and Germany reveals much about civic boundaries in the modern world.

The difference between French and German definitions of citizenship is instructive - and, for millions of immigrants from North Africa, Turkey, and Eastern Europe, decisive. Brubaker explores this difference - between the territorial basis of the French citizenry and the German emphasis on blood descent - and shows how it translates into rights and restrictions for millions of would-be French and German citizens. Why French citizenship is territorially inclusive, and German citizenship ethnically exclusive, becomes clear in Brubaker's historical account of distinctive French and German paths to nation-statehood. Two fundamental legal principles of national citizenship emerge from this analysis, leading Brubaker to broad and original observations on the constitution of the modern state.

We live in a world bounded and defined by the legal institution of citizenship. The plight of immigrants moving across Western Europe has made this a particularly salient point, one frequently missed but finally brought into sharp focus here. Linking law, state, economy, and culture across two countries and centuries, this book offers a powerful explanation of forces that shape the modern world and delineate its future.

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Edition Availability
Cover of: Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany
Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany
August 19, 1998, Harvard University Press
Paperback in English
Cover of: Citizenship and nationhood in France and Germany
Citizenship and nationhood in France and Germany
1992, Harvard University Press
in English
Cover of: Citizenship and nationhood in France and Germany
Citizenship and nationhood in France and Germany
1992, Harvard University Press
in English

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Citizenship and nationhood in France and Germany

First published in 1992



Work Description

The state, wrote Aristotle, "is a compound made up of citizens; and this compels us to consider who should properly be called a citizen and what a citizen really is." These are the questions, with their broad implications for the modern nation-state, that Rogers Brubaker addresses here. In a time when the flow of information, capital, and immigration has blurred the definition of the state, Brubaker's sustained analysis of the origins and vicissitudes of citizenship in France and Germany reveals much about civic boundaries in the modern world.

The difference between French and German definitions of citizenship is instructive - and, for millions of immigrants from North Africa, Turkey, and Eastern Europe, decisive. Brubaker explores this difference - between the territorial basis of the French citizenry and the German emphasis on blood descent - and shows how it translates into rights and restrictions for millions of would-be French and German citizens. Why French citizenship is territorially inclusive, and German citizenship ethnically exclusive, becomes clear in Brubaker's historical account of distinctive French and German paths to nation-statehood. Two fundamental legal principles of national citizenship emerge from this analysis, leading Brubaker to broad and original observations on the constitution of the modern state.

We live in a world bounded and defined by the legal institution of citizenship. The plight of immigrants moving across Western Europe has made this a particularly salient point, one frequently missed but finally brought into sharp focus here. Linking law, state, economy, and culture across two countries and centuries, this book offers a powerful explanation of forces that shape the modern world and delineate its future.

Classifications

Library of Congress JN2919 .B78 1992
Dewey 323.6/0944

Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany

This edition published in by Harvard University Press


The Physical Object

Format
Paperback
Number of pages
284
Dimensions
9.1 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
Weight
14.9 ounces

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL7692203M
Internet Archive
citizenshipnatio00brub_081
ISBN 10
0674131789
ISBN 13
9780674131781
Library Thing
342930
Goodreads
810794

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History

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October 8, 2017 Edited by Clean Up Bot merge duplicate works of 'Citizenship and nationhood in France and Germany'
July 29, 2014 Edited by ImportBot import new book
April 6, 2014 Edited by ImportBot Added IA ID.
August 6, 2010 Edited by IdentifierBot added LibraryThing ID
April 29, 2008 Created by an anonymous user Imported from amazon.com record.