Cover of: Conscience for Change by Martin Luther King Jr.
An edition of Conscience for Change (1967)

Conscience for Change

Massey Lecture (Massey Lecture)

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Last edited by WorkBot
October 17, 2010 | History
An edition of Conscience for Change (1967)

Conscience for Change

Massey Lecture (Massey Lecture)

  • 0 Ratings
  • 1 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading
  • 0 Have read
Publish Date
Language
English

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Edition Availability
Cover of: Conscience for Change
Conscience for Change: CBC Massey Lecture 1967 (Massey Lectures)
September 15, 2007, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC Audio)
Audio CD in English - Unabridged edition
Cover of: Conscience for Change
Conscience for Change: Massey Lecture (Massey Lecture)
February 2001, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC Audio)
in English
Cover of: Conscience for change [sound recording]
Cover of: Conscience for change.
Conscience for change.
1968, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
in English
Cover of: Conscience for change
Conscience for change
1967, Canadian Broadcasting Company
in English

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Book Details


ID Numbers

Open Library
OL7626974M
ISBN 10
0660183293
ISBN 13
9780660183299
Goodreads
2471341

Excerpts

In the 1967 Massey Lectures, Martin Luther King writes:

"Canada is not merely a neighbor to Negroes. Deep in our history of struggle for freedom Canada was the north star. The Negro slave, denied education, de-humanized, imprisoned on cruel plantations, knew that far to the north a land existed where a fugitive slave if he survived the horrors of the journey could find freedom. The legendary underground railroad started in the south and ended in Canada. The freedom road links us together. Our spirituals, now so widely admired around the world, were often codes. We sang of "heaven" that awaited us and the slave masters listened in innocence, not realizing that we were not speaking of the hereafter. Heaven was the word for Canada and the Negro sang of the hope that his escape on the underground railroad would carry him there. One of our spirituals, Follow the Drinking Gourd, in it's disguised lyrics contained directions for escape. The gourd was the big dipper, and the north star to which its handle pointed gave the celestial map that directed the flight to the Canadian border. So standing today in Canada I am linked with the history of my people and its unity with your past."
added by mita. "from the CBC Massey Lectures website"

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History

Download catalog record: RDF / JSON / OPDS | Wikipedia citation
October 17, 2010 Edited by WorkBot merge works
April 24, 2010 Edited by Open Library Bot Fixed duplicate goodreads IDs.
April 16, 2010 Edited by bgimpertBot Added goodreads ID.
April 14, 2010 Edited by Open Library Bot Linked existing covers to the edition.
September 5, 2009 Edited by LA2 merge author records