Cover of: Origin of the Mennonite Brethren Church by

Download Options

Buy this book

When you buy books using these links the Internet Archive may earn a small commission.

Last edited by Jon Isaak
April 26, 2021 | History

Origin of the Mennonite Brethren Church

  • 0 Ratings
  • 0 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading
  • 0 Have read

This edition was published in by The Mennonite Brethren Historical Society of the Midwest in Hillsboro, Kansas.

Written in English

233 pages

Jacob P. Bekker (1828-1908) was one of the principal leaders of the Mennonite Brethren Church that emerged after first beginning to meet in 1857. Becker, a member of the Rudnerweide Mennonite church in the Molotschna settlement in Ukraine, had taken part in revivalist meetings in 1854 and “converted” to the “brethren” renewal movement. On January 6, 1860, the renewal group formally seceded from the Mennonite Church to form their own Mennonite Church, the Mennonite Brethren Church. Bekker was one of the 18 signatories to the document of secession. Later that year, in September 1860, he and others of the new group decided to signify their renewal identity by being “rebaptized” by immersion. From 1857 to 1864, Bekker functioned as secretary for the movement. A decade later, in 1875, Bekker and his family migrated to the United States. Sensing a need to tell his story, in 1890, he took it upon himself to write an account of the origin of the Mennonite Brethren Church based on his recollections and the documents he had collected. This book is the English translation of Bekker’s German manuscript.

Read more

Previews available in: English

Edition Availability
Cover of: Origin of the Mennonite Brethren Church
Origin of the Mennonite Brethren Church
1973, The Mennonite Brethren Historical Society of the Midwest
Hardcover in English

Add another edition?

Origin of the Mennonite Brethren Church

First published in 1973



Work Description

Jacob P. Bekker (1828-1908) was one of the principal leaders of the Mennonite Brethren Church that emerged after first beginning to meet in 1857. Becker, a member of the Rudnerweide Mennonite church in the Molotschna settlement in Ukraine, had taken part in revivalist meetings in 1854 and “converted” to the “brethren” renewal movement. On January 6, 1860, the renewal group formally seceded from the Mennonite Church to form their own Mennonite Church, the Mennonite Brethren Church. Bekker was one of the 18 signatories to the document of secession. Later that year, in September 1860, he and others of the new group decided to signify their renewal identity by being “rebaptized” by immersion. From 1857 to 1864, Bekker functioned as secretary for the movement. A decade later, in 1875, Bekker and his family migrated to the United States. Sensing a need to tell his story, in 1890, he took it upon himself to write an account of the origin of the Mennonite Brethren Church based on his recollections and the documents he had collected. This book is the English translation of Bekker’s German manuscript.

Origin of the Mennonite Brethren Church

This edition was published in by The Mennonite Brethren Historical Society of the Midwest in Hillsboro, Kansas.


Table of Contents

Introduction v
Foreword vii
About the Author ix
Preface xii
1. Biography of Menno Simons 1
2. Persecution 4
- Migration to Prussia
- The Privilegium
- Oppression which resulted in the desire to migrate to Russia
- Hindrances to the migration
3. The Immigrant Entry into Russia 10
4. Decadence of the Mennonites 17
5. Restoration Through Wuest 22
- Wuest's inaugural message and his ministry
6. The Bases for the Separation 31
7. Spiritual Labors in the Saratova District 35
8. The Secession and its Consequences 43
- Document No. 1
9. Opposition to the Secession 48
- Documents No. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15
10. Claassen's Escape to St. Petersburg 66
- Candidate list and baptism
- Summoned to appear before the District Government
- The Thirty-two in Court
11. Edicts Against the Secessionists 79
- Documents No. 16, 17
12. Communication of the Five Elders 87
- Document No. 18
- The Visiting Council
- Documents No. 19, 20, 21
13. Good and Bad Rumors 95
- Visit by the Molokans and the conversion of Russians
- Old Colony people baptized
- General observations
14. Reports in Mennonitische Blaetter 106
- Documents No. 22, 23
15. Report in the Friedensglocke 110
- Document No. 24
16. Reports by Two Different Preachers 113
- Documents No. 25, 26
17. Discussions about the Separation 118
- Documents No. 26a, 27
18. Criticism of the Secession 127
19. Authorization Signed 133
20. The Memorandum 142
21. Various Separatist Movements 154
22. The Mennonite Brethren Church Spreads 167
- Differences between Baptists and the Mennonite Brethren
Maps 183
- Ukraine, Russia
- East Prussia, West Prussia, Poland
- Molotschna Colony
Appendix 186
- On the Return of our Lord
- Regarding the Return of Christ and the Resurrection of the Dead
Index 207

Edition Notes

Copyright Date
1973
Translation Of
Der Ursprung der Mennoniten-Brüdergemeinde
Translated From
German / Deutsch

Contributors

Translator
Daniel E. Pauls
Translator
Abraham E. Janzen

The Physical Object

Format
Hardcover
Pagination
xiii, 215p.
Number of pages
233
Dimensions
8.25 x 5.0 x 0.75 inches

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL32241947M
Internet Archive
origin-of-the-mennonite-brethren-church-ocr
LC Control Number
73-91056
OCLC/WorldCat
1043703036

Community Reviews (0)

Feedback?
No community reviews have been submitted for this work.

Lists containing this Book

History

Download catalog record: RDF / JSON / OPDS | Wikipedia citation
April 26, 2021 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
April 26, 2021 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
April 26, 2021 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
April 26, 2021 Edited by Jon Isaak Edited without comment.
April 26, 2021 Created by Jon Isaak Added new book.