Cover of: iGen by Jean M. Twenge, PhD
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October 11, 2020 | History
An edition of iGen (2018)

iGen

why today's super-connected kids are growing up less rebellious, more tolerant, less happy -- and completely unprepared for adulthood (and what that means for the rest of us)

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This edition was published in by Atria Books in New York.

Written in English

They were born after 1995. They grew up with cell phones, had an Instagram page before they started high school, and do not remember a time before the Internet. They are iGen. In the book that has sparked conversations around the world, Dr. Jean Twenge offers a revelatory portrait of a new generation growing up more slowly and more anxious -- but also more socially tolerant and safe -- then any generation in history. Through her deep analysis of data drawn from more than 11 million respondents over multiple decades, Dr. Twenge identifies iGen's surprising attitudes toward religion, sexuality, and politics, as well as unprecedented levels of anxiety and loneliness. As this new group of young people grows into adulthood, parents, educators, and employers have an urgent need to understand them. Because where iGen goes, so goes our nation -- and the world. - Back cover.

As seen in Time, USA TODAY, The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, and on CBS This Morning, BBC, PBS, CNN, and NPR, iGen is crucial reading to understand how the children, teens, and young adults born in the mid-1990s and later are vastly different from their Millennial predecessors, and from any other generation. With generational divides wider than ever, parents, educators, and employers have an urgent need to understand today's rising generation of teens and young adults. Born in the mid-1990s up to the mid-2000s, iGen is the first generation to spend their entire adolescence in the age of the smartphone. With social media and texting replacing other activities, iGen spends less time with their friends in person -- perhaps contributing to their unprecedented levels of anxiety, depression, and loneliness. But technology is not the only thing that makes iGen distinct from every generation before them; they are also different in how they spend their time, how they behave, and in their attitudes toward religion, sexuality, and politics. They socialize in completely new ways, reject once sacred social taboos, and want different things from their lives and careers. More than previous generations, they are obsessed with safety, focused on tolerance, and have no patience for inequality. With the first members of iGen just graduating from college, we all need to understand them: friends and family need to look out for them; businesses must figure out how to recruit them and sell to them; colleges and universities must know how to educate and guide them. And members of iGen also need to understand themselves as they communicate with their elders and explain their views to their older peers. Because where iGen goes, so goes our nation -- and the world. - Publisher.

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iGen

First published in 2018



Work Description

They were born after 1995. They grew up with cell phones, had an Instagram page before they started high school, and do not remember a time before the Internet. They are iGen. In the book that has sparked conversations around the world, Dr. Jean Twenge offers a revelatory portrait of a new generation growing up more slowly and more anxious -- but also more socially tolerant and safe -- then any generation in history. Through her deep analysis of data drawn from more than 11 million respondents over multiple decades, Dr. Twenge identifies iGen's surprising attitudes toward religion, sexuality, and politics, as well as unprecedented levels of anxiety and loneliness. As this new group of young people grows into adulthood, parents, educators, and employers have an urgent need to understand them. Because where iGen goes, so goes our nation -- and the world. - Back cover.

As seen in Time, USA TODAY, The Atlantic, The Wall Street Journal, and on CBS This Morning, BBC, PBS, CNN, and NPR, iGen is crucial reading to understand how the children, teens, and young adults born in the mid-1990s and later are vastly different from their Millennial predecessors, and from any other generation. With generational divides wider than ever, parents, educators, and employers have an urgent need to understand today's rising generation of teens and young adults. Born in the mid-1990s up to the mid-2000s, iGen is the first generation to spend their entire adolescence in the age of the smartphone. With social media and texting replacing other activities, iGen spends less time with their friends in person -- perhaps contributing to their unprecedented levels of anxiety, depression, and loneliness. But technology is not the only thing that makes iGen distinct from every generation before them; they are also different in how they spend their time, how they behave, and in their attitudes toward religion, sexuality, and politics. They socialize in completely new ways, reject once sacred social taboos, and want different things from their lives and careers. More than previous generations, they are obsessed with safety, focused on tolerance, and have no patience for inequality. With the first members of iGen just graduating from college, we all need to understand them: friends and family need to look out for them; businesses must figure out how to recruit them and sell to them; colleges and universities must know how to educate and guide them. And members of iGen also need to understand themselves as they communicate with their elders and explain their views to their older peers. Because where iGen goes, so goes our nation -- and the world. - Publisher.

iGen

why today's super-connected kids are growing up less rebellious, more tolerant, less happy -- and completely unprepared for adulthood (and what that means for the rest of us)

This edition was published in by Atria Books in New York.


Table of Contents

Introduction : Who is iGen, and how do we know?
In no hurry : growing up slowly
Internet : online time, oh, and other media too
In person no more : I'm with you, but only virtually
Insecure : the new mental health crisis
Irreligious : losing my religion (and spirituality)
Insulated but not less intrinsic : more safety and less community
Income insecurity : working to earn, but not to shop
Indefinite : sex, marriage, and children
Inclusive : LGBT, gender, and race issues in the new age
Independent : politics
Conclusion : Understanding, and saving, iGen
About the author

Edition Notes

1st Atria paperback ed.

Copyright Date
2017

Classifications

Library of Congress
HQ799.7.T95 2017

The Physical Object

Format
Paperback
Pagination
viii, 342 p.
Dimensions
24 x x centimeters

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL26677974M
ISBN 10
1501152017
ISBN 13
9781501152016

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October 11, 2020 Edited by ImportBot import existing book
February 7, 2019 Edited by Bryan Tyson Edited without comment.
January 31, 2019 Edited by Bryan Tyson Added new cover
January 31, 2019 Edited by Bryan Tyson Edited without comment.
January 31, 2019 Created by Bryan Tyson Added new book.