Click here to skip to this page's main content.

New Feature: You can now embed Open Library books on your website!   Learn More
Last edited by Open Library Bot
December 3, 2010 | History

FAITHFUL TO THE GOOD: MORALITY AND PHILOSOPHY IN NURSING PRACTICE (ETHICS) 1 edition

FAITHFUL TO THE GOOD: MORALITY AND PHILOSOPHY IN NURSING PRACTICE (ETH ...
Joan Liaschenko

No ebook available.


Buy this book

Add an ISBN in order to
link to booksellers


Good grief. There's no description for this book yet. Can you help?
There is only 1 edition record, so we'll show it here...  •  Add edition?

FAITHFUL TO THE GOOD: MORALITY AND PHILOSOPHY IN NURSING PRACTICE (ETHICS).

Published 1993 .

About the Book

Practice has embedded within it a morality which is derived from the very activity of that practice. This study illustrates an actual morality of nursing practice across the three domains of ethical experience; virtue, duty, and cultural ethos. Stories of the concerns experienced in their practice were elicited from 9 psychiatric and 10 home care nurses. Each nurse was interviewed twice for an approximate total of three hours. Philosophically, these stories were considered to exhibit narrative rationality and they were analyzed by using techniques of narrative analysis.

In this research, nursing ethics is seen as comprised of the four aspects which constitute the moral work of practice: having a life, acting for, relationship, and testimony. For these nurses, helping patients to have a life lay at the moral heart of their practice. To have a life is to have a sense of agency, to occupy social and political space, to live a temporally structured existence, and to die. The work of nursing inevitably necessitated that these nurses act for their patients in several domains; physical, psychological, and integrity of the self. The potential for the abuse of power in such situations was offset by knowing the patient. This was made possible through the relationship between nurse and patient, specifically by listening and entering the patient's world. The significance of having a life lay in the distinction between the knowing of the person in her world and the knowing of the patient as an object of biomedical science. These epistemologies and the values which underlie them frequently collided head on in the everyday realities of health care. When this happened, nurses questioned the ends and means of medicine. Such challenges were always raised against the background of what a given intervention would mean for the patient in their world. Speaking morally, these nurses bear witness to lives and give testimony. This study goes beyond principles and care to suggest a content for nursing ethics.

Edition Notes

Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 55-02, Section: B, page: 0367.

Thesis (PH.D.)--UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO, 1993.

School code: 0034.

The Physical Object

Pagination
318 p.
Number of pages
318

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL17911335M

History Created December 11, 2009 · 2 revisions Download catalog record: RDF / JSON

December 3, 2010 Edited by Open Library Bot Added subjects from MARC records.
December 11, 2009 Created by WorkBot add works page