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Last edited by Open Library Bot
December 3, 2010 | History

THE SEARCH FOR MEANING AMONG PERSONS LIVING WITH RECURRENT CANCER (MEANING, CANCER) 1 edition

THE SEARCH FOR MEANING AMONG PERSONS LIVING WITH RECURRENT CANCER (MEA ...
Elizabeth Johnston Taylor

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THE SEARCH FOR MEANING AMONG PERSONS LIVING WITH RECURRENT CANCER (MEANING, CANCER).

Published 1992 .

About the Book

Attributions theory suggests that persons experiencing a negative or unexpected life event, search for meaning. The experience of having cancer is one such life event, and there is substantial evidence that persons living with cancer search for meaning. While the phenomenon is old, research investigating the search for meaning among persons with cancer is recent and sparse. Thus, this descriptive, cross-sectional study investigated: (a) the prevalence and context of the phenomenon, (b) patients' perceptions of the process and outcomes of the search for meaning, (c) factors associated with the search for meaning, and (d) factors associated with finding meaning.

Seventy-four persons diagnosed with recurrent cancer completed standardized tools including the Purpose In Life Test, Symptom Distress Scale, Enforced Social Dependency Scale, and Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale; also, non-standardized demographic and "Search for Meaning" surveys were completed (Phase I). Utilizing a semi-structured interview format, ten of these subjects then provided in-depth qualitative data (Phase II). Analysis of the data employed SPSS statistical procedures and qualitative techniques.

Nearly half of those interviewed reported searching for meaning. Significant inverse correlations were observed between sense of meaning and symptom distress, social dependency, and length of time since recurrent diagnosis. Adjustment to illness was positively correlated with sense of meaning. Many demographic and illness variables were observed to not be associated with searching for or finding meaning. There was no significant difference in sense of meaning between those who searched and did not search, yet those who searched had poorer adjustment to illness.

The qualitative data analysis produced several factor-isolating theories. Outcomes of the search included causal attributions, construed good, and perceptions regarding the order or randomness of the universe. Three categories of subjects emerged: Those who reconcile, remonstrate, and resign themselves to the meaning of their cancer. Qualitative data also suggested the process is often associated with symptom distress, and thoughts regarding family, death, or religion.

These findings suggest that the sense of meaning is integrally associated with the physical and psychosocial effects of illness, and lend empirical support to nursing's renewed interest in spiritual care for those who search for meaning.

Edition Notes

Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 53-08, Section: B, page: 4036.

Thesis (PH.D.)--UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, 1992.

School code: 0175.

The Physical Object

Pagination
263 p.
Number of pages
263

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL17892881M

History Created December 11, 2009 · 2 revisions Download catalog record: RDF / JSON

December 3, 2010 Edited by Open Library Bot Added subjects from MARC records.
December 11, 2009 Created by WorkBot add works page