Cover of: Paris to the moon | Adam Gopnik
Preview

Buy this book

Last edited by Clean Up Bot
July 22, 2019 | History
An edition of Paris to the moon (2000)

Paris to the moon

1st ed
  • 0 Ratings
  • 4 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading
  • 0 Have read

This edition published in by Random House in New York.

Written in English

338 pages

Paris. The name alone conjures images of chestnut-lined boulevards, sidewalk cafes, breathtaking facades around every corner--in short, an exquisite romanticism that has captured the American imagination for as long as there have been Americans. In 1995, Adam Gopnik, his wife, and their infant son left the familiar comforts and hassles of New York City for the urbane glamour of the City of Light. Gopnik is a longtime New Yorker writer, and the magazine has sent its writers to Paris for decades--but his was above all a personal pilgrimage to the place that had for so long been the undisputed capital of everything cultural and beautiful. It was also the opportunity to raise a child who would know what it was to romp in the Luxembourg Gardens, to enjoy a croque monsieur in a Left Bank cafe--a child (and perhaps a father, too) who would have a grasp of that Parisian sense of style we Americans find so elusive. So, in the grand tradition of the American abroad, Gopnik walked the paths of the Tuileries, enjoyed philosophical discussions at his local bistro, wrote as violet twilight fell on the arrondissements. Of course, as readers of Gopnik's beloved and award-winning "Paris Journals" in The New Yorker know, there was also the matter of raising a child and carrying on with day-to-day, not-so-fabled life. Evenings with French intellectuals preceded middle-of-the-night baby feedings; afternoons were filled with trips to the Musee d'Orsay and pinball games; weekday leftovers were eaten while three-star chefs debated a "culinary crisis."As Gopnik describes in this funny and tender book, the dual processes of navigating a foreign city and becoming a parent are not completely dissimilar journeys--both hold new routines, new languages, a new set of rules by which everyday life is lived. With singular wit and insight, Gopnik weaves the magical with the mundane in a wholly delightful, often hilarious look at what it was to be an American family man in Paris at the end of the twentieth century. "We went to Paris for a sentimental reeducation-I did anyway-even though the sentiments we were instructed in were not the ones we were expecting to learn, which I believe is why they call it an education."

Read more

Previews available in: English

Edition Availability
Cover of: Paris to the moon
Paris to the moon
2001, G.K. Hall
in English
Cover of: Paris to the Moon
Paris to the Moon
2001, Random House Publishing Group
E-book in English
Cover of: Paris to the moon
Paris to the moon
2001, Random House Trade Paperbacks
in English - Random House trade pbk. ed.
Cover of: Paris to the moon
Paris to the moon
2000, Random House
in English
Cover of: Paris to the moon
Paris to the moon
2000, Random House
in English - 1st ed

Add another edition?

Paris to the moon

First published in 2000



Work Description

Paris. The name alone conjures images of chestnut-lined boulevards, sidewalk cafes, breathtaking facades around every corner--in short, an exquisite romanticism that has captured the American imagination for as long as there have been Americans. In 1995, Adam Gopnik, his wife, and their infant son left the familiar comforts and hassles of New York City for the urbane glamour of the City of Light. Gopnik is a longtime New Yorker writer, and the magazine has sent its writers to Paris for decades--but his was above all a personal pilgrimage to the place that had for so long been the undisputed capital of everything cultural and beautiful. It was also the opportunity to raise a child who would know what it was to romp in the Luxembourg Gardens, to enjoy a croque monsieur in a Left Bank cafe--a child (and perhaps a father, too) who would have a grasp of that Parisian sense of style we Americans find so elusive. So, in the grand tradition of the American abroad, Gopnik walked the paths of the Tuileries, enjoyed philosophical discussions at his local bistro, wrote as violet twilight fell on the arrondissements. Of course, as readers of Gopnik's beloved and award-winning "Paris Journals" in The New Yorker know, there was also the matter of raising a child and carrying on with day-to-day, not-so-fabled life. Evenings with French intellectuals preceded middle-of-the-night baby feedings; afternoons were filled with trips to the Musee d'Orsay and pinball games; weekday leftovers were eaten while three-star chefs debated a "culinary crisis."As Gopnik describes in this funny and tender book, the dual processes of navigating a foreign city and becoming a parent are not completely dissimilar journeys--both hold new routines, new languages, a new set of rules by which everyday life is lived. With singular wit and insight, Gopnik weaves the magical with the mundane in a wholly delightful, often hilarious look at what it was to be an American family man in Paris at the end of the twentieth century. "We went to Paris for a sentimental reeducation-I did anyway-even though the sentiments we were instructed in were not the ones we were expecting to learn, which I believe is why they call it an education."

Paris to the moon

1st ed

This edition published in by Random House in New York.


Classifications

Library of Congress
DC718.A44 G67 2000

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL18118505M
Internet Archive
paristomoongopr00gopn
ISBN 10
0679444920
LC Control Number
00037297
Library Thing
4898
Goodreads
227749

Lists containing this Book

History

Download catalog record: RDF / JSON
July 22, 2019 Edited by Clean Up Bot remove fake subjects
April 19, 2013 Edited by AnandBot Added "Popular Print Disabled Books" subject.
June 22, 2010 Edited by ImportBot add details from OverDrive
May 5, 2010 Edited by ImportBot add scanned books from the Internet Archive
December 10, 2009 Created by WorkBot add works page