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An edition of The philosophy of Wu Chʻeng (1999)

The philosophy of Wu Chʻeng

a neo-Confucian of the Yüan dynasty = [Wu Chʻeng]

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This edition published in by Research Institute for Inner Asian Studies, Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind.

Written in English

206 pages

This first full-length study of the thought of Wu Ch’eng (1249-1333), who was the foremost classical scholar and philosopher during the century of Mongol rule in China, incorporates translations of his seminal essays on metaphysics, ethics, and the mind. Trained in the teachings of the Sung thinker Chu Hsi, who emphasized broad learning to understand moral principles, Wu's reflections on the Confucian tradition and his experiences in official position and as a private teacher led him toward moral introspection and the intuitionism of Chu's contemporary Lu Hsiang-shan. Wu believed that metaphysical discourse was limited by language, that only through experience could one assimilate moral truth to illuminate the mind. In synthesizing Sung Confucian ideas, Wu foreshadowed trends in Ming and Ch’ing thought. Ming thinkers who developed the philosophy of mind, such as Wang Yang-ming, endorsed Wu’s path to moral enlightenment, and Wu’s synthesis of scholarship and introspection, as well as his creative approach to learning and intellectual freedom, had an impact on thinkers well into the Ch'ing era.

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Cover of: The philosophy of Wu Chʻeng
The philosophy of Wu Chʻeng: a neo-Confucian of the Yüan dynasty = [Wu Chʻeng]
1999, Research Institute for Inner Asian Studies, Indiana University
in English

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The philosophy of Wu Chʻeng

First published in 1999



Work Description

This first full-length study of the thought of Wu Ch’eng (1249-1333), who was the foremost classical scholar and philosopher during the century of Mongol rule in China, incorporates translations of his seminal essays on metaphysics, ethics, and the mind. Trained in the teachings of the Sung thinker Chu Hsi, who emphasized broad learning to understand moral principles, Wu's reflections on the Confucian tradition and his experiences in official position and as a private teacher led him toward moral introspection and the intuitionism of Chu's contemporary Lu Hsiang-shan. Wu believed that metaphysical discourse was limited by language, that only through experience could one assimilate moral truth to illuminate the mind. In synthesizing Sung Confucian ideas, Wu foreshadowed trends in Ming and Ch’ing thought. Ming thinkers who developed the philosophy of mind, such as Wang Yang-ming, endorsed Wu’s path to moral enlightenment, and Wu’s synthesis of scholarship and introspection, as well as his creative approach to learning and intellectual freedom, had an impact on thinkers well into the Ch'ing era.

The philosophy of Wu Chʻeng

a neo-Confucian of the Yüan dynasty = [Wu Chʻeng]

This edition published in by Research Institute for Inner Asian Studies, Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind.


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 177-196) and index.
Parallel title in Chinese characters.

Series
Indiana University oriental series ;
Other Titles
Wu Chʻeng

Classifications

Dewey Decimal Class
181/.112
Library of Congress
B5234.W78 G43 1999

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL55920M
ISBN 10
0933070446
LC Control Number
99070016
Goodreads
2849177

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History

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October 27, 2011 Edited by 24.140.24.212 Edited without comment.
October 27, 2011 Edited by 24.140.24.212 Edited without comment.
October 27, 2011 Edited by 24.140.24.212 Edited without comment.
December 4, 2010 Edited by Open Library Bot Added subjects from MARC records.
December 8, 2009 Created by ImportBot add works page