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Revision 13 by Vinnie Rattolle November 28, 2016
Revision 14 by Vinnie Rattolle November 28, 2016
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0 "American Film" is a magazine published by The American Film Institute from 1975-1992. 10 issues were published yearly (January and August were skipped), with 166 issues in total. Subtitled "The Journal of the Film and Television Arts" the magazine was noted for having insightful information on Hollywood classics. 0 "American Film" is a magazine published by The American Film Institute from 1975-1992. 10 issues were published yearly (January and August were skipped), with 166 issues in total. Originally subtitled "The Journal of the Film and Television Arts" the highbrow magazine initially focused on film classics but the focus soon shifted to contemporary movies.  Countless people associated with the film industry contributed articles and columns, including Francois Truffaut, Ernest Lehman, Leonard Maltin, Roger Ebert, Roger Greenspun, Larry McMurty, and others.
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2 In addition to the information about movies and television, the journal offers an insightful view on the home video industry, chronicling the introductions of VHS, Beta, Videodisc and laserdisc and continuing through the VHS boom in the early '90s when the magazine folded. 2 In addition to the information about movies and television, the journal offers an insightful view on the home video industry, chronicling the introductions of VHS, Beta, Videodisc and laserdisc and continuing through the VHS boom in the early '90s when the magazine folded. In July 1980, they introduced "The Video Scene," a multi-column section centered on home video, punctuated with ads and printed on a different paper stock. Ads for videotapes began to surface quickly during the run of the magazine and then exploded, with the first major ad being for The Video Club of America's release of "The Sound of Music" in the May 1979 issue.
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4 AFI struggled in the publishing market so the magazine went through a vast array of changes over the years. Early issues were black-and-white with a 16-page card-stock centerfold for their "Dialogue on Film" column, which featured transcripts of discussions with film legends. Beginning with the April 1978 issue, the publishers switched to a cheaper paper stock. In December 1978, they added color spreads, by the 1980s they were publishing full-color issues, and in 1989 the entire format was changed to glossy, oversized magazines. 4 AFI struggled in the publishing market so the magazine went through a vast array of changes over the years. Early issues were black-and-white, ad-free, with a 16-page card-stock centerfold for their "Dialogue on Film" column, which featured transcripts of Q&A discussions with film legends. Beginning with the April 1978 issue, the publishers switched to a cheaper paper stock. By 1978, they began to become overrun with advertisements and in December, they added color spreads, predominantly for noteworthy new films. By the 1980s they were publishing full-color issues, and in 1989 the entire format was changed to glossy, oversized magazines.