Cover of: Socratic moral psychology | Thomas C. Brickhouse

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November 13, 2020 | History
An edition of Socratic moral psychology (2010)

Socratic moral psychology

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This edition was published in by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, . New York.

Written in English

276 pages

"Socrates' moral psychology is widely thought to be 'intellectualist' in the sense that, for Socrates, every ethical failure to do what is best is exclusively the result of some cognitive failure to apprehend what is best. Until fairly recently, the view that, for Socrates, emotions and desires have no role to play in causing such failure went unchallenged. This book argues against the orthodox view of Socratic intellectualism and offers in its place a comprehensive alternative account that explains why Socrates believed that emotions, desires and appetites can influence human motivation and lead to error. Thomas C. Brickhouse and Nicholas D. Smith defend the study of Socrates' philosophy and offer a new interpretation of Socratic moral psychology. Their novel account of Socrates' conception of virtue and how it is acquired shows that Socratic moral psychology is considerably more sophisticated than scholars have supposed"--

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Cover of: Socratic moral psychology
Socratic moral psychology
2010, Cambridge University Press
in English

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Socratic moral psychology

First published in 2010



Work Description

"Socrates' moral psychology is widely thought to be 'intellectualist' in the sense that, for Socrates, every ethical failure to do what is best is exclusively the result of some cognitive failure to apprehend what is best. Until fairly recently, the view that, for Socrates, emotions and desires have no role to play in causing such failure went unchallenged. This book argues against the orthodox view of Socratic intellectualism and offers in its place a comprehensive alternative account that explains why Socrates believed that emotions, desires and appetites can influence human motivation and lead to error. Thomas C. Brickhouse and Nicholas D. Smith defend the study of Socrates' philosophy and offer a new interpretation of Socratic moral psychology. Their novel account of Socrates' conception of virtue and how it is acquired shows that Socratic moral psychology is considerably more sophisticated than scholars have supposed"--

Socratic moral psychology

This edition was published in by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, . New York.


Edition Description

"Socrates' moral psychology is widely thought to be 'intellectualist' in the sense that, for Socrates, every ethical failure to do what is best is exclusively the result of some cognitive failure to apprehend what is best. Until fairly recently, the view that, for Socrates, emotions and desires have no role to play in causing such failure went unchallenged. This book argues against the orthodox view of Socratic intellectualism and offers in its place a comprehensive alternative account that explains why Socrates believed that emotions, desires and appetites can influence human motivation and lead to error. Thomas C. Brickhouse and Nicholas D. Smith defend the study of Socrates' philosophy and offer a new interpretation of Socratic moral psychology. Their novel account of Socrates' conception of virtue and how it is acquired shows that Socratic moral psychology is considerably more sophisticated than scholars have supposed"--

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Classifications

Dewey Decimal Class
170.92
Library of Congress
B317 .B695 2010

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL24478498M
Internet Archive
socraticmoralpsy00bric
ISBN 10
0521198437
ISBN 13
9780521198431
LC Control Number
2010007555
OCLC/WorldCat
580076233

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History

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November 13, 2020 Edited by Clean Up Bot import existing book
November 30, 2010 Created by ImportBot initial import