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Last edited by Anand Chitipothu
November 23, 2012 | History
An edition of Savrola (1899)

Savrola

a tale of the revolution in Laurania

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This edition was published in by Longmans, Green in New York [etc.].

Written in English

345 pages

Savrola is Winston Churchill’s first major literary effort and his only full-length work of fiction. Published in the U.S. in 1899 and 1900 in the U.K., the novel’s subtitle, A Tale of the Revolution in Laurania, reflects the story’s modern political focus. Savrola contains the seeds of Churchill’s exceptional talents as a statesman, a political philosopher, and a man of literature. The ambition of Savrola to rule foreshadows Churchill’s own life-long career as the greatest democratic leader of the past century. In the novel, Churchill the thinker explores the challenges of securing democratic order and avoiding mob rule. He sketches a model of the education needed for modern statesmanship and describes the kind of rhetoric that appeals to a modern democratic people. Elements of Churchill’s literary style in the novel anticipate the greatness of his later prose works that would merit him the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Laurania, a long-established republic, is subjected to the autocratic rule of President Antonio Molara, a former general who has become known as the Dictator. Savrola, the man of the multitude, leads the democratic effort to restore the political liberties of the people. When the register of eligible electors is mutilated and the popular franchise compromised, a riot breaks out and the stage is set for a fight to the death between Molara and Savrola over who will rule Laurania. General Molara enlists the assistance of his beautiful wife, Lucille, to undermine Savrola’s influence with the people. But Lucille falls in love with Savrola, who is equally moved by the beauty and charm of the First Lady. As is indicated by the last chapter’s title, "Life’s Compensations," all ends well in Laurania. After the violent troubles of the revolution, Molara is dead, Lucille and Savrola are united, and the Mediterranean republic returns to peace and prosperity.

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Edition Availability
Cover of: Savrola
Savrola: a tale of the revolution in Laurania
1990, Leo Cooper in association with Octopus Pub.
in English
Cover of: Savrola
Savrola: [a tale of the revolution in Laurania
1974, Library of Imperial History
in English - Centenary limited edition.
Cover of: Savrola
Cover of: Savrola
Cover of: Savrola
Savrola: roman.
1948
in French / français
Cover of: Savrola
Savrola
1915, Hodder and Stoughton
in English
Cover of: Savrola
Cover of: Savrola
Savrola: a tale of the revolution in Laurania
1900, Longmans, Green
in English
Cover of: Savrola
Cover of: Savrola
Cover of: Savrola
Cover of: Savrola
Cover of: Savrola
Cover of: Savrola
Cover of: Savrola
Cover of: Savrola

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Savrola

A Tale of the Revolution in Laurania

First published in 1899



Work Description

Savrola is Winston Churchill’s first major literary effort and his only full-length work of fiction. Published in the U.S. in 1899 and 1900 in the U.K., the novel’s subtitle, A Tale of the Revolution in Laurania, reflects the story’s modern political focus. Savrola contains the seeds of Churchill’s exceptional talents as a statesman, a political philosopher, and a man of literature. The ambition of Savrola to rule foreshadows Churchill’s own life-long career as the greatest democratic leader of the past century. In the novel, Churchill the thinker explores the challenges of securing democratic order and avoiding mob rule. He sketches a model of the education needed for modern statesmanship and describes the kind of rhetoric that appeals to a modern democratic people. Elements of Churchill’s literary style in the novel anticipate the greatness of his later prose works that would merit him the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Laurania, a long-established republic, is subjected to the autocratic rule of President Antonio Molara, a former general who has become known as the Dictator. Savrola, the man of the multitude, leads the democratic effort to restore the political liberties of the people. When the register of eligible electors is mutilated and the popular franchise compromised, a riot breaks out and the stage is set for a fight to the death between Molara and Savrola over who will rule Laurania. General Molara enlists the assistance of his beautiful wife, Lucille, to undermine Savrola’s influence with the people. But Lucille falls in love with Savrola, who is equally moved by the beauty and charm of the First Lady. As is indicated by the last chapter’s title, "Life’s Compensations," all ends well in Laurania. After the violent troubles of the revolution, Molara is dead, Lucille and Savrola are united, and the Mediterranean republic returns to peace and prosperity.

Classifications

Dewey 823/.912

Savrola

a tale of the revolution in Laurania

This edition was published in by Longmans, Green in New York [etc.].


Edition Notes

Genre
Fiction.

Classifications

Library of Congress
PZ3.C4743 Sav 6, PR6005.H83 Sav 6

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL529908M
Internet Archive
savrolaatalerev00churgoog
LC Control Number
99005606
OCLC/WorldCat
4421210

Lists containing this Book

History

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November 23, 2012 Edited by Anand Chitipothu Reverted spam
November 22, 2012 Edited by 188.190.125.67 Edited without comment.
September 18, 2012 Edited by Mark W Krahn Added new cover
September 18, 2012 Edited by Mark W Krahn Edited without comment.
October 19, 2009 Created by WorkBot add works page