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January 24, 2010 | History

Design of multivalent, peptide-based drug delivery vehicles and investigation into mechanisms mediating their cellular uptake 1 edition

Design of multivalent, peptide-based drug delivery vehicles and invest ...
Michael T. Sung

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Design of multivalent, peptide-based drug delivery vehicles and investigation into mechanisms mediating their cellular uptake.

Published 2006 .
Written in English.

About the Book

A successful drug delivery vehicle has to facilitate the internalization and intracellular trafficking of its cargo to a desired organelle along a characterized pathway, a process described as 'vectorial delivery.' The present work focuses on the design of peptide-based drug delivery vehicles based on the principle of multivalency. The tetramerization domain of the human p53 protein (hp53tet) served as the structural scaffold for multivalent intracellular trafficking vehicles. Cationic import signal (IS) sequences and the nuclear localization sequence (NLS) from SV40 large T-antigen were incorporated at the N-terminus of the hp53 tet peptides. This approach generated peptide constructs able to relocate into cells and facilitate macromolecular cargos transport with significantly enhanced efficiency resulted from their tetrameric arrangement. This enhancement was particularly dramatic in the case of deca-arginine containing constructs. These deca-arginyl constructs were found to enter through a clathrin-mediated process after binding to cell surface glycosaminoglycans, specifically heparan sulfates.

Edition Notes

Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 44-06, page: 2727.

Thesis (M.Sc.)--University of Toronto, 2006.

Electronic version licensed for access by U. of T. users.

ROBARTS MICROTEXT copy on microfiche.

The Physical Object

Pagination
131 leaves.
Number of pages
131

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL19215102M
ISBN 13
9780494161586

History Created December 11, 2009 · 2 revisions Download catalog record: RDF / JSON

January 24, 2010 Edited by WorkBot add more information to works
December 11, 2009 Created by WorkBot add works page