Cover of: On to the Yalu | Edwin Palmer Hoyt
Preview
Last edited by mountainaxe
June 27, 2019 | History
An edition of On to the Yalu (1984)

On to the Yalu

  • 0 Ratings
  • 0 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading
  • 0 Have read

This edition published in by Stein and Day in New York.

Written in English

297 pages

Thousands of Marines huddled in their landing craft, watching with foreboding as they drew closer and closer to the seawall at Inchon. Overhead, American planes pounded the shore. The North Koreans were waiting, and they were an enemy the Americans had learned not to underestimate. This is the Inchon landing - the last bold stroke of Douglas MacArthur's career. It is September 1950, and American forces have been on the defensive for almost 3 months - ever since the North Koreans launched a surprise attack across the 38th parallel, capturing Seoul in two days and pressing the Americans and their South Korean I was back into a tip of the South Korean Peninsula around Pusan. For a while it seemed that all was lost. Inchon is the beginning of a victory. But it is a short-lived victory, and it leads to catastrophe. The Americans have struck back with a skill and energy the North Koreans had not expected, but, in doing so, they soon overreach themselves. MacArthur brushes aside caution and sets out in hot pursuit of the suddenly retreating Communists. As Americans and South Korean troops crossed into North Korea and push on towards the Yalu River that divides Korea from China's Manchuria, the real question becomes: Will the Red Chinese come to the aid of their ideological comrades?

Read more

Previews available in: English

Edition Availability
Cover of: On to the Yalu
On to the Yalu
1988, Military Heritage
Unknown Binding in English
Cover of: On to the Yalu
On to the Yalu
1984, Stein and Day
in English
Cover of: On to the Yalu
On to the Yalu
1984, Stein and Day
in English - [Book club ed.]

Add another edition?

On to the Yalu

First published in 1984



Work Description

Thousands of Marines huddled in their landing craft, watching with foreboding as they drew closer and closer to the seawall at Inchon. Overhead, American planes pounded the shore. The North Koreans were waiting, and they were an enemy the Americans had learned not to underestimate. This is the Inchon landing - the last bold stroke of Douglas MacArthur's career. It is September 1950, and American forces have been on the defensive for almost 3 months - ever since the North Koreans launched a surprise attack across the 38th parallel, capturing Seoul in two days and pressing the Americans and their South Korean I was back into a tip of the South Korean Peninsula around Pusan. For a while it seemed that all was lost. Inchon is the beginning of a victory. But it is a short-lived victory, and it leads to catastrophe. The Americans have struck back with a skill and energy the North Koreans had not expected, but, in doing so, they soon overreach themselves. MacArthur brushes aside caution and sets out in hot pursuit of the suddenly retreating Communists. As Americans and South Korean troops crossed into North Korea and push on towards the Yalu River that divides Korea from China's Manchuria, the real question becomes: Will the Red Chinese come to the aid of their ideological comrades?

On to the Yalu

This edition published in by Stein and Day in New York.


Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 283-284.
Includes index.

Classifications

Dewey Decimal Class
951.9/042
Library of Congress
DS918 .H659 1984

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL2866764M
Internet Archive
ontoyalu00hoyt
ISBN 10
0812829778
LC Control Number
84040240
Library Thing
2607303
Goodreads
3890008

Lists containing this Book

History

Download catalog record: RDF / JSON
June 27, 2019 Edited by mountainaxe Added new cover
June 27, 2019 Edited by mountainaxe Edited without comment.
June 27, 2019 Edited by mountainaxe Edited without comment.
April 30, 2017 Edited by ImportBot import new book
October 18, 2009 Created by WorkBot add works page