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Last edited by Bryan Tyson
November 26, 2019 | History
An edition of The Burning Tigris (2003)

The Burning Tigris

The Armenian Genocide and America's Response — 1st edition

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This edition published in by HarperCollins in New York.

Written in English

496 pages

In this groundbreaking history of the Armenian Genocide, the critically acclaimed author of the memoir Black Dog of Fate brings us a riveting narrative of the massacres of the Armenians in the 1890s and genocide in 1915 at the hands of the Ottoman Turks. Using rarely seen archival documents and remarkable first-person accounts, Peter Balakian presents the chilling history of how the Young Turk government implemented the first modern genocide behind the cover of World War I. And in the telling, he also resurrects an extraordinary lost chapter of American history. During the United States' ascension in the global arena at the turn of the twentieth century, America's humanitarian movement for Armenia was an important part of the rising nation's first epoch of internationalism. Intellectuals, politicians, diplomats, religious leaders, and ordinary citizens came together to try to save the Armenians. The Burning Tigris reconstructs this landmark American cause that was spearheaded by the passionate commitments and commentaries of a remarkable cast of public figures, including Julia Ward Howe, Clara Barton, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Ambassador Henry Morgenthau, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Alice Stone Blackwell, Stephen Crane, and Ezra Pound, as well as courageous missionaries, diplomats, and relief workers who recorded their eyewitness accounts and often risked their lives in the killing fields of Armenia. The crisis of the "starving Armenians" was so embedded om American popular culture that, in an age when a loaf of bread cost a nickel, the American people sent more than $100 million in aid through the American Committee on Armenian Atrocities and its successor, Near East Relief. In 1915 alone, the New York Times published 145 articles about the Armenian Genocide. Theodore Roosevelt called the extermination of the Armenians "the greatest crime of the war." But in the turmoul following World War I, it was a crime that went largely unpunished. In depicting the 1919 Ottoman court-martial trials, Balakian reveals the perpetrators of the Armenian Genocide confessing their guilt -- an astonishing fact given the Turkish government's continued denial of the Genocide. After World War I, U.S. oil interests in the Middle East steered America away from the course it had pursued for four decades. As Balakian eloquently points out, America's struggle between human rights and national self-interest -- a pattern that would be repeated again and again -- resonates powerfully today. In crucial ways, America's involvement with the Armenian Genocide is a paradigm for the modern age. - Jacket flap.

In this national bestseller, the critically acclaimed author Peter Balakian brings us a riveting narrative of the massacres of the Armenians in the 1890s and of the Armenian Genocide in 1915 at the hands of the Ottoman Turks. Using rarely seen archival documents and remarkable first-person accounts, Balakian presents the chilling history of how the Turkish government implemented the first modern genocide behind the cover of World War I. And in the telling, he resurrects an extraordinary lost chapter of American history. - Publisher.

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Edition Availability
Cover of: Burning Tigris, The
Burning Tigris, The: The Armenian Genocide and America's Response
September 30, 2003, HarperCollins
in English
Cover of: The Burning Tigris
The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America's Response
September 30, 2003, HarperCollins
Hardcover in English - 1st edition

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The Burning Tigris First published in 2003



First Sentence

"The light in New England in late fall is austere and clean and rinses the white steeples of Boston's Congregational and Unitarian churches, the red brick of the State House, and the gray stone of the Back Bay town houses."

Work Description

In this groundbreaking history of the Armenian Genocide, the critically acclaimed author of the memoir Black Dog of Fate brings us a riveting narrative of the massacres of the Armenians in the 1890s and genocide in 1915 at the hands of the Ottoman Turks. Using rarely seen archival documents and remarkable first-person accounts, Peter Balakian presents the chilling history of how the Young Turk government implemented the first modern genocide behind the cover of World War I. And in the telling, he also resurrects an extraordinary lost chapter of American history. During the United States' ascension in the global arena at the turn of the twentieth century, America's humanitarian movement for Armenia was an important part of the rising nation's first epoch of internationalism. Intellectuals, politicians, diplomats, religious leaders, and ordinary citizens came together to try to save the Armenians. The Burning Tigris reconstructs this landmark American cause that was spearheaded by the passionate commitments and commentaries of a remarkable cast of public figures, including Julia Ward Howe, Clara Barton, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Ambassador Henry Morgenthau, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Alice Stone Blackwell, Stephen Crane, and Ezra Pound, as well as courageous missionaries, diplomats, and relief workers who recorded their eyewitness accounts and often risked their lives in the killing fields of Armenia. The crisis of the "starving Armenians" was so embedded om American popular culture that, in an age when a loaf of bread cost a nickel, the American people sent more than $100 million in aid through the American Committee on Armenian Atrocities and its successor, Near East Relief. In 1915 alone, the New York Times published 145 articles about the Armenian Genocide. Theodore Roosevelt called the extermination of the Armenians "the greatest crime of the war." But in the turmoul following World War I, it was a crime that went largely unpunished. In depicting the 1919 Ottoman court-martial trials, Balakian reveals the perpetrators of the Armenian Genocide confessing their guilt -- an astonishing fact given the Turkish government's continued denial of the Genocide. After World War I, U.S. oil interests in the Middle East steered America away from the course it had pursued for four decades. As Balakian eloquently points out, America's struggle between human rights and national self-interest -- a pattern that would be repeated again and again -- resonates powerfully today. In crucial ways, America's involvement with the Armenian Genocide is a paradigm for the modern age. - Jacket flap.

In this national bestseller, the critically acclaimed author Peter Balakian brings us a riveting narrative of the massacres of the Armenians in the 1890s and of the Armenian Genocide in 1915 at the hands of the Ottoman Turks. Using rarely seen archival documents and remarkable first-person accounts, Balakian presents the chilling history of how the Turkish government implemented the first modern genocide behind the cover of World War I. And in the telling, he resurrects an extraordinary lost chapter of American history. - Publisher.

First Sentence

"The light in New England in late fall is austere and clean and rinses the white steeples of Boston's Congregational and Unitarian churches, the red brick of the State House, and the gray stone of the Back Bay town houses."

Table of Contents

Gathering at Faneuil Hall
"There in the woods"
Yankees in Armenia
Sultan and the Armenian question
Killing fields: Massacres of the 1890s
Humanity on trial: Clara Barton and America's mission to Armenia
Walking skeletons
"The tears of Araxes": Voice of the Womans's journal
Ottoman bank incident and the aftermath of the Hamidian massacres
"Our boasted civilization": Intellectuals, popular culture, and the Armenian massacres of the 1890s
Rise of the young Turks
Adana, 1909: Counterrevolution and massacre
Balkan wars and World War I: Road to genocide
Government-planned genocide
Van, spring 1915
April 24
Ambassador at the crossroads
News from the American consul in Harput
Land of dead
From Jesse Jackson in Aleppo
"Same fate": Reports from all over Turkey
America's golden rule: Working for Armenia again
Wilson's quandary
Rise of a new Turkish nationalism and the campaign against Armenia
Turkish confessions: Ottoman courts-martial, Constantinople, 1919-1920
American mandate for Armenia
New U.S. oil policy in the Middle East and the turnabout on the Armenian question
Epilogue : Turkish denial of the Armenian genocide and U.S. complicity

Edition Notes

"A history of international human rights and forgotten heroes" - cover.
PEN/Martha Albrand Award for Nonfiction
Awarded the Raphael Lemkin Prize for the best scholarly book on genocide by the Institute for Genocide Studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice/CUNY Graduate Center.

Copyright Date
2003

The Physical Object

Format
Hardcover
Pagination
xx, 475 p.
Number of pages
496
Dimensions
9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
Weight
1.8 pounds

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL9230693M
ISBN 10
0060198400
ISBN 13
9780060198404
Library Thing
13775
Goodreads
1033765

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History

Download catalog record: RDF / JSON / OPDS | Wikipedia citation
November 26, 2019 Edited by Bryan Tyson Edited without comment.
November 26, 2019 Edited by Bryan Tyson Edited without comment.
August 12, 2010 Edited by IdentifierBot added LibraryThing ID
April 24, 2010 Edited by Open Library Bot Fixed duplicate goodreads IDs.
April 30, 2008 Created by an anonymous user Imported from amazon.com record.