Cover of: The Poetic Zeal | Caleiph Ken'yon Brewer

About the Book

Overtime I've learned the nature of purpose. In theory, we all pursue life seeking some form of validation. What cultivates uniqueness? What empowerment can we offer the world? How can we improve ourselves? These questions have sent me on a provocative journey- The Poetic Zeal. This literature is presented in five categories. The first chapter illustrates self- reckoning. In my teen years my mother would always tell me, "Son, success is not determined by where you come from- it's about where you are going." Mothers it seems know best. However once in college, I put a slight twist to her saying. I have a faith that success is not only measured by where one is going or from. It's about what you want in life and the desire to achieve goals will ultimately lead you to the success. Sometimes life's experience has led me to believe that sticking with the program and staying where you are was the virtuous act. In my continued battle of that assertion, I come to the conclusion that the threat of regression is greater than the fear of subjection. Nevertheless, I've acquired the instinct to accept trails and tribulations of the past as a lesson, while acknowledging the present and forgoing the future. Expressions in Japanese calligraphy (Shodou) are great examples of poetic method. The Western absorption of this art influenced the development of haiku. Haikus are a structure of three stanzas with a distinct set of syllables (respectively 5, 7, and 5.) In relevance to the facets of form, the second chapter of this book features a composition of haiku's. The third chapter addresses the predominating and prevalent issues within society. Life in the ghetto was a growing pain (i.e. frequent candle lit shrines, the infeasibility of educational and economic advancement and the ever present dilemma of identity.) Initially I had reservations not to include societal topics in my work. I thought harping on controversial issues would diminish from the art of poetry and could project as condemning. The focus of this section is not to condemn but to shed light on the neglected corners of society. For the most part, I believe the overall struggle for a democratic livelihood is something we all should aspire to achieve. The third part of this manuscript acknowledges war and pays tribute to the sacrifices thereof. As an Iraqi war veteran I've experience close hand the impact in fighting overseas and can identify with its affect. Leadership within our system of government is a constant balancing act. Despite political turmoil and its mandates of approach, our service members are the true granters' of the free world. The deliverance of former Vice-President Al Gore warns that our planet has a fever. In figurative sense our subtle differences and worldly conflicts fueled through prejudice, greed, pride and profits contributed to this infection. In fact they are the infection. But whatever happened to compassion? The final part of this manuscript is my take on empathy and the arts. Parts of this section are sensually expressive while others are morsels of artistry.

About the Edition

Overtime I've learned the nature of purpose. In theory, we all pursue life seeking some form of validation. What cultivates uniqueness? What empowerment can we offer the world? How can we improve ourselves? These questions have sent me on a provocative journey- The Poetic Zeal.

This literature is presented in five categories. The first chapter illustrates self- reckoning. In my teen years my mother would always tell me, "Son, success is not determined by where you come from- it's about where you are going."

Mothers it seems know best. However once in college, I put a slight twist to her saying. I have a faith that success is not only measured by where one is going or from. It's about what you want in life and the desire to achieve goals will ultimately lead you to the success.

Sometimes life's experience has led me to believe that sticking with the program and staying where you are was the virtuous act. In my continued battle of that assertion, I come to the conclusion that the threat of regression is greater than the fear of subjection. Nevertheless, I've acquired the instinct to accept trails and tribulations of the past as a lesson, while acknowledging the present and forgoing the future.

Expressions in Japanese calligraphy (Shodou) are great examples of poetic method. The Western absorption of this art influenced the development of haiku. Haikus are a structure of three stanzas with a distinct set of syllables (respectively 5, 7, and 5.) In relevance to the facets of form, the second chapter of this book features a composition of haiku's. The third chapter addresses the predominating and prevalent issues within society. Life in the ghetto was a growing pain (i.e. frequent candle lit shrines, the infeasibility of educational and economic advancement and the ever present dilemma of identity.)

Initially I had reservations not to include societal topics in my work. I thought harping on controversial issues would diminish from the art of poetry and could project as condemning. The focus of this section is not to condemn but to shed light on the neglected corners of society. For the most part, I believe the overall struggle for a democratic livelihood is something we all should aspire to achieve.

The third part of this manuscript acknowledges war and pays tribute to the sacrifices thereof. As an Iraqi war veteran I've experience close hand the impact in fighting overseas and can identify with its affect. Leadership within our system of government is a constant balancing act. Despite political turmoil and its mandates of approach, our service members are the true granters' of the free world.

The deliverance of former Vice-President Al Gore warns that our planet has a fever. In figurative sense our subtle differences and worldly conflicts fueled through prejudice, greed, pride and profits contributed to this infection. In fact they are the infection. But whatever happened to compassion? The final part of this manuscript is my take on empathy and the arts. Parts of this section are sensually expressive while others are morsels of artistry.

Edition Notes

Genre
Jazz Poetry

The Physical Object

Format
Hardcover
Pagination
101p.
Number of pages
101
Dimensions
9 x 6 x 0.4 inches
Weight
11.4 ounces

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL8512734M
Internet Archive
poeticzeal0000brew
ISBN 10
1425730612
ISBN 13
9781425730611
OCLC/WorldCat
191956730
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