Cover of: The Studio | Time-Life Books

About the Book

Photography can be approached from either of two directions. One approach is the way of the photojournalist, the quick-eyed observer who catches life on the wing as it flies past the camera lens, capturing the spontaneous picture that will make the front page -- or the family album.

The studio photographer travels an entirely different route. A painstaking craftsman, he plans a picture as carefully as an architect designs a house, often taking days to arrange his composition and adjust his lighting before clicking his shutter. Rather than reporting events from the sidelines, he stages his own and exercises total control.

To acquire this control and increase his flexibility, the amateur beginning studio photography may wish to acquire a whole roomful of paraphernalia -- floodlights, spotlights, reflectors, tripods, electronic-flash units and view cameras of various sizes. He may also wish, as professionals do, to operate like the designer of a theatrical production, constructing entire sets. Professional studios are sometimes large and elaborate, with barn-size rooms, carloads of expensive equipment and big staffs of photo assistants, set builders, wardrobe mistresses and stylists. But an expensive establishment is really unnecessary for most studio work, and any amateur can set up his own studio with nothing more than a camera, a room, a few lights, and perhaps a roll of seamless photographic paper for a backdrop. And by borrowing a few techniques from professionals, he can even come close to their goal: a kind of photographic perfection reachable only through the studio photographer's unique ability to manipulate every step of the picture-taking process.

About the Edition

Photography can be approached from either of two directions. One approach is the way of the photojournalist, the quick-eyed observer who catches life on the wing as it flies past the camera lens, capturing the spontaneous picture that will make the front page -- or the family album.

The studio photographer travels an entirely different route. A painstaking craftsman, he plans a picture as carefully as an architect designs a house, often taking days to arrange his composition and adjust his lighting before clicking his shutter. Rather than reporting events from the sidelines, he stages his own and exercises total control.

To acquire this control and increase his flexibility, the amateur beginning studio photography may wish to acquire a whole roomful of paraphernalia -- floodlights, spotlights, reflectors, tripods, electronic-flash units and view cameras of various sizes. He may also wish, as professionals do, to operate like the designer of a theatrical production, constructing entire sets. Professional studios are sometimes large and elaborate, with barn-size rooms, carloads of expensive equipment and big staffs of photo assistants, set builders, wardrobe mistresses and stylists. But an expensive establishment is really unnecessary for most studio work, and any amateur can set up his own studio with nothing more than a camera, a room, a few lights, and perhaps a roll of seamless photographic paper for a backdrop. And by borrowing a few techniques from professionals, he can even come close to their goal: a kind of photographic perfection reachable only through the studio photographer's unique ability to manipulate every step of the picture-taking process.

First Sentence

Studio photographers are among the highest-paid, most influential figures in the entire field of photography.

Table of Contents

1 The Photographer in Control 9
2 Evolution of the Studio 43
3 The Studio on Location 77
4 Focusing on Fashion 103
5 A Versatile Studio Tool 141
6 The Studio at Home 171
7 The Art of Everyday Objects

Edition Notes

Bibliography, p. 233; Index, p. 235.

Series
Life Library of Photography #9
Genre
Handbook

Classifications

Dewey Decimal Class
770.28
Library of Congress
TR550 .T55

The Physical Object

Format
Hardcover
Pagination
236 p., ill.
Number of pages
236
Dimensions
26 x 26 cm

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL5705488M
Internet Archive
studiotime00time
LC Control Number
70154544
OCLC/WorldCat
151145
Library Thing
883947

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