Cover of: Ion | Euripides

About the Book

he Ion is the shortest, or nearly the shortest, of all the writings which bear the name of Plato, and is not authenticated by any early external testimony. The grace and beauty of this little work supply the only, and perhaps a sufficient, proof of its genuineness. The plan is simple; the dramatic interest consists entirely in the contrast between the irony of Socrates and the transparent vanity and childlike enthusiasm of the rhapsode Ion. The theme of the Dialogue may possibly have been suggested by the passage of Xenophon's Memorabilia in which the rhapsodists are described by Euthydemus as 'very precise about the exact words of Homer, but very idiotic themselves.' (Compare Aristotle, Met.)

Ion the rhapsode has just come to Athens; he has been exhibiting in Epidaurus at the festival of Asclepius, and is intending to exhibit at the festival of the Panathenaea. Socrates admires and envies the rhapsode's art; for he is always well dressed and in good company--in the company of good poets and of Homer, who is the prince of them. In the course of conversation the admission is elicited from Ion that his skill is restricted to Homer, and that he knows nothing of inferior poets, such as Hesiod and Archilochus;--he brightens up and is wide awake when Homer is being recited, but is apt to go to sleep at the recitations of any other poet. 'And yet, surely, he who knows the superior ought to know the inferior also;--he who can judge of the good speaker is able to judge of the bad. And poetry is a whole; and he who judges of poetry by rules of art ought to be able to judge of all poetry.' This is confirmed by the analogy of sculpture, painting, flute-playing, and the other arts. The argument is at last brought home to the mind of Ion, who asks how this contradiction is to be solved.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. xlii-li).

Series
Oxford world's classics, Oxford world's classics (Oxford University Press)
Genre
Translations into English., Drama.
Other Titles
Ion ; Orestes ; Phoenician women ; Suppliant women, Orestes and other plays, Ion.

Classifications

Dewey Decimal Class
882/.01
Library of Congress
PA3975 .A2 2001

The Physical Object

Pagination
lv, 219 p. :
Number of pages
219

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL3946657M
Internet Archive
ionorestesphoeni0000euri
ISBN 10
0192832603
LC Control Number
2001032879
Library Thing
1854771
Goodreads
1489

You'll be next in line.

Download ebook for print-disabled Download Protected DAISY


Prefer the physical book? Check nearby libraries with:


Buy this book

Amazon $3.38 (used)
Better World Books

History

Download catalog record: RDF / JSON / OPDS
January 17, 2019 Edited by ImportBot import existing book
August 3, 2010 Edited by IdentifierBot added LibraryThing ID
April 16, 2010 Edited by bgimpertBot Added goodreads ID.
April 14, 2010 Edited by Open Library Bot Linked existing covers to the edition.
April 1, 2008 Created by an anonymous user Initial record created, from Scriblio MARC record.