Cover of: The Puzzle Palace by James Bamford
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Last edited by Robin Lionheart
April 24, 2012 | History
An edition of The Puzzle Palace (1982)

The Puzzle Palace

A Report on America's Most Secret Agency

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This edition was published in by Houghton Mifflin in Boston.

Written in English

465 pages

The book the NSA tried to suppress -- with a startling new afterword on the Geoffrey Arthur Prime spy case. The National Security Agency is the largest, most secretive, and potentially most intrusive American intelligence agency. It dwarfs the CIA in budget, manpower, and influence. In the three decades it has existed, the NSA has demonstrated a shocking disregard for the law. Until now, the inner workings of this agency have eluded public scrutiny. In this remarkable tour de force of investigative reporting, however, James Bamford penetrates the NSA's vast network of power -- the acres of computers, the electronic listening posts worldwide, the intelligence-gathering satellites, and the people who control them. The Puzzle Palace is a brilliant account of the use and abuse of technological espionage and of the frightening Orwellian potential of today's intelligence communites. - Back cover.

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Previews available in: English

Edition Availability
Cover of: The Puzzle Palace
Cover of: The Puzzle Palace
The Puzzle Palace: Americaʹs National Security Agency and its special relationship with Britainʹs GCHQ
28 April 1983, Sidgwick & Jackson
Hardcover in English
Cover of: The Puzzle Palace
Cover of: The puzzle palace
The puzzle palace: a report on America's most secret agency
1983, Penguin Books
Paperback in English
Cover of: The puzzle palace
The puzzle palace: a reporton America's most secret agency
1982, Houghton Mifflin
in English
Cover of: The Puzzle Palace
The Puzzle Palace: A Report on America's Most Secret Agency
23 September 1982, Houghton Mifflin
Hardcover in English

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The Puzzle Palace

First published in 1982



Work Description

The book the NSA tried to suppress -- with a startling new afterword on the Geoffrey Arthur Prime spy case. The National Security Agency is the largest, most secretive, and potentially most intrusive American intelligence agency. It dwarfs the CIA in budget, manpower, and influence. In the three decades it has existed, the NSA has demonstrated a shocking disregard for the law. Until now, the inner workings of this agency have eluded public scrutiny. In this remarkable tour de force of investigative reporting, however, James Bamford penetrates the NSA's vast network of power -- the acres of computers, the electronic listening posts worldwide, the intelligence-gathering satellites, and the people who control them. The Puzzle Palace is a brilliant account of the use and abuse of technological espionage and of the frightening Orwellian potential of today's intelligence communites. - Back cover.

The Puzzle Palace

A Report on America's Most Secret Agency

This edition was published in by Houghton Mifflin in Boston.


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Copyright Date
1982

Classifications

Dewey Decimal Class
327.1/2/06073
Library of Congress
UB251.U5 B35 1982

The Physical Object

Format
Hardcover
Pagination
465 p. ;
Number of pages
465

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL3483606M
Internet Archive
puzzlepalacerepo00bamf
ISBN 10
0395312868
ISBN 13
9780395312865
LC Control Number
82003056
Google
q7beAAAAMAAJ
Library Thing
7943
Goodreads
345075

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April 24, 2012 Edited by Robin Lionheart date
April 24, 2012 Edited by Robin Lionheart Added new cover
April 24, 2012 Edited by Robin Lionheart hc, (c)
April 24, 2012 Edited by Robin Lionheart caps
April 1, 2008 Created by an anonymous user Imported from Scriblio MARC record.