Imperial identity in the Mughal Empire
Lisa Balabanlilar
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August 2, 2020 | History

Imperial identity in the Mughal Empire

memory and dynastic politics in early modern South and Central Asia

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"Having monopolized Central Asian politics and culture for over a century, the Timurid ruling elite was forced from its ancestral homeland in Transoxiana at the turn of the sixteenth century by an invading Uzbek tribal confederation. The Timurids travelled south: establishing themselves as the new rulers of a region roughly comprising modern Afghanistan, Pakistan and northern India, and founding what would become the Mughal Empire (1526-1857). The last survivors of the House of Timur, the Mughals drew invaluable political capital from their lineage, which was recognized for its charismatic genealogy and court culture - the features of which are examined here. By identifying Mughal loyalty to Turco-Mongol institutions and traditions, Lisa Balabanlilar here positions the Mughal dynasty at the centre of the early modern Islamic world as the direct successors of a powerful political and religious tradition." --

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Cover of: Imperial identity in the Mughal Empire
Imperial identity in the Mughal Empire: memory and dynastic politics in early modern South and Central Asia
2012, I.B. Tauris, distributed in the United States and Canada exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan
in English

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Imperial identity in the Mughal Empire

First published in 2012



Work Description

"Having monopolized Central Asian politics and culture for over a century, the Timurid ruling elite was forced from its ancestral homeland in Transoxiana at the turn of the sixteenth century by an invading Uzbek tribal confederation. The Timurids travelled south: establishing themselves as the new rulers of a region roughly comprising modern Afghanistan, Pakistan and northern India, and founding what would become the Mughal Empire (1526-1857). The last survivors of the House of Timur, the Mughals drew invaluable political capital from their lineage, which was recognized for its charismatic genealogy and court culture - the features of which are examined here. By identifying Mughal loyalty to Turco-Mongol institutions and traditions, Lisa Balabanlilar here positions the Mughal dynasty at the centre of the early modern Islamic world as the direct successors of a powerful political and religious tradition." --

Imperial identity in the Mughal Empire

memory and dynastic politics in early modern South and Central Asia

This edition published in by I.B. Tauris, distributed in the United States and Canada exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan in London, . New York, . New York.


Edition Description

"Having monopolized Central Asian politics and culture for over a century, the Timurid ruling elite was forced from its ancestral homeland in Transoxiana at the turn of the sixteenth century by an invading Uzbek tribal confederation. The Timurids travelled south: establishing themselves as the new rulers of a region roughly comprising modern Afghanistan, Pakistan and northern India, and founding what would become the Mughal Empire (1526-1857). The last survivors of the House of Timur, the Mughals drew invaluable political capital from their lineage, which was recognized for its charismatic genealogy and court culture - the features of which are examined here. By identifying Mughal loyalty to Turco-Mongol institutions and traditions, Lisa Balabanlilar here positions the Mughal dynasty at the centre of the early modern Islamic world as the direct successors of a powerful political and religious tradition." --

Table of Contents

Timurid political charisma and the ideology of rule
Babur and the Timurid exile
Dynastic memory and the genealogical cult
The peripatetic court and the Timurid-Mughal landscape
Legitimacy, restless princes and the imperial succession
Imagining Kingship.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [192]-209) and index.

Series
Library of South Asian history and culture -- v. 1, Library of South Asian history and culture -- v. 1.

Classifications

Dewey Decimal Class
954.025
Library of Congress
DS461 .B25 2012

The Physical Object

Pagination
xix, 216 p. :
Number of pages
216

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL25273571M
ISBN 10
1848857268
ISBN 13
9781848857261
LC Control Number
2011277054
OCLC/WorldCat
751754682

Lists containing this Book

History

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August 2, 2020 Edited by ImportBot import existing book
June 27, 2012 Edited by LC Bot import new book
April 13, 2012 Created by LC Bot Imported from Library of Congress MARC record.