The Emperor Elagabalus
Leonardo de Arrizabalaga y Pra ...
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April 26, 2011 | History
An edition of The Emperor Elagabalus (2010)

The Emperor Elagabalus

fact or fiction?

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This edition was published in by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, . New York.

Written in English

"The third-century adolescent Roman emperor miscalled Elagabalus or Heliogabalus was made into myth shortly after his murder. For 1800 years since, scandalous stories relate his alleged depravity, debauchery, and bloodthirsty fanaticism as high priest of a Syrian sun god. From these, one cannot discern anything demonstrably true about the boy or his reign. This book, drawing on the author's detailed research and publications, investigates what can truly be known about this emperor. Through careful analysis of all sources, including historiography, coins, inscriptions, papyri, sculpture, and topography, it shows that there are things of which we can be sure, and others that are likely. Through these we can reassess his reign. We discover a youth, thrust by his handlers into power on false pretences, who creates his own more authentic persona as priest-emperor, but loses the struggle for survival against rivals in his family, who justify his murder with his myth"--Provided by publisher.

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Cover of: The Emperor Elagabalus
The Emperor Elagabalus: fact or fiction?
2010, Cambridge University Press
in English

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The Emperor Elagabalus

fact or fiction?

This edition was published in by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, . New York.


Edition Description

"The third-century adolescent Roman emperor miscalled Elagabalus or Heliogabalus was made into myth shortly after his murder. For 1800 years since, scandalous stories relate his alleged depravity, debauchery, and bloodthirsty fanaticism as high priest of a Syrian sun god. From these, one cannot discern anything demonstrably true about the boy or his reign. This book, drawing on the author's detailed research and publications, investigates what can truly be known about this emperor. Through careful analysis of all sources, including historiography, coins, inscriptions, papyri, sculpture, and topography, it shows that there are things of which we can be sure, and others that are likely. Through these we can reassess his reign. We discover a youth, thrust by his handlers into power on false pretences, who creates his own more authentic persona as priest-emperor, but loses the struggle for survival against rivals in his family, who justify his murder with his myth"--Provided by publisher.

Table of Contents

pt. 1. Exposition
Radical and basic questions
Problematic
Sources and method of enquiry
pt. 2. Explosion
Varius, Elagabalus, and Heliogabalus
Varian texts
Analysis of Varian propositions
pt. 3. Constitution
A mental exercise
Coins
Inscriptions
Papyri, ostraca, and mummy labels
Sculpture : round
Sculpture : relief
Topography
Res gestae
pt. 4. Speculation
The question Why?
Varius' priesthood
Varius' childhood
Varius' heritage
Varius' reality
pt. 5. Findings in contexts
Findings
Varius' family
The Severan dynasty
The Roman principate
Varius' shift
Varius and his models
Severan self-presentation
Varius and the imperial administration
Varius and history
Varius and culture
Appendix 1: Theory of knowledge
Appendix 2: Varian propositions
Appendix 3: Varian coin concordance
Appendix 4: List of Varian inscriptions
Appendix 5: List of Varian papyri, ostraca, and mummy labels
Appendix 6: Varian chronology.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Classifications

Dewey Decimal Class
937/.07092
Library of Congress
DG303 .A77 2010

The Physical Object

Pagination
p. cm.

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL24492311M
ISBN 13
9780521895552
LC Control Number
2010000701
OCLC/WorldCat
432978486

Lists containing this Book

History

Download catalog record: RDF / JSON / OPDS | Wikipedia citation
April 26, 2011 Edited by OCLC Bot Added OCLC numbers.
December 4, 2010 Created by ImportBot Imported from Library of Congress MARC record.