Cover of: Digital barbarism | Mark Helprin

About the Book

World-renowned novelist Mark Helprin offers a ringing Jeffersonian defense of private property in the age of digital culture, with its degradation of thought and language, and collectivist bias against the rights of individual creators.Mark Helprin anticipated that his 2007 New York Times op-ed piece about the extension of the term of copyright would be received quietly, if not altogether overlooked. Within a week, the article had accumulated 750,000 angry comments. He was shocked by the breathtaking sense of entitlement demonstrated by the commenters, and appalled by the breadth, speed, and illogic of their responses. Helprin realized how drastically different this generation is from those before it. The Creative Commons movement and the copyright abolitionists, like the rest of their generation, were educated with a modern bias toward collaboration, which has led them to denigrate individual efforts and in turn fueled their sense of entitlement to the fruits of other people's labors. More important, their selfish desire to 'stick it' to the greedy corporate interests who control the production and distribution of intellectual property undermines not just the possibility of an independent literary culture but threatens the future of civilization itself.

About the Edition

Mark Helprin anticipated that his 2007 New York Times op-ed piece about the extension of the term of copyright would be received quietly, if not altogether overlooked. Within a week, the article had accumulated 750,000 angry comments. He was shocked by the breathtaking sense of entitlement demonstrated by the commenters, and appalled by the breadth, speed, and illogic of their responses. Helprin realized how drastically different this generation is from those before it. The Creative Commons movement and the copyright abolitionists, like the rest of their generation, were educated with a bias toward collaboration, which has led them to denigrate individual efforts and in turn fueled their sense of entitlement to the fruits of other people's labors. More important, their desire to "stick it" to the greedy corporate interests who control the production and distribution of intellectual property undermines not just the possibility of an independent literary culture but threatens the future of civilization itself.--From publisher description.

Table of Contents

The acceleration of tranquility : civilization and velocity
Death on a red horse : the first targets of the barbarians are copyright and the individual voice
Notes on Virginia : reclaiming Jefferson and taking care of Macaulay
The espresso book machine : using machines to hold machines in check
Property as a coefficient of liberty : property is not antithetical to virtue
Convergence : wait as long as you want, it will not come
Parthian shot : calling barbarism for what it is.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [219]-223) and index.

Classifications

Library of Congress
K1401 .H457 2009

The Physical Object

Pagination
xvii, 232 p. ;
Number of pages
232

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL23842533M
Internet Archive
digitalbarbarism00help
ISBN 10
0061733113
ISBN 13
9780061733116
LC Control Number
2009497461
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History

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August 30, 2018 Edited by ImportBot import new book
March 16, 2010 Edited by WorkBot add editions to new work
October 19, 2009 Created by ImportBot Initial record created, from Library of Congress MARC record.