The Canterbury tales
Geoffrey Chaucer

About the Book

A collection of stories written in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer at the end of the 14th century. The tales (mostly in verse, although some are in prose) are told as part of a story-telling contest by a group of pilgrims as they travel together on a journey from Southwark to the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral. In a long list of works, including Troilus and Criseyde, House of Fame, and Parliament of Fowls, The Canterbury Tales was Chaucer's magnum opus. He uses the tales and the descriptions of the characters to paint an ironic and critical portrait of English society at the time, and particularly of the Church. Structurally, the collection bears the influence of The Decameron, which Chaucer is said to have come across during his first diplomatic mission to Italy in 1372. However, Chaucer peoples his tales with 'sondry folk' rather than Boccaccio's fleeing nobles.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [xxiii]-xxv).

Series
Oxford World's classics
Genre
Poetry.

Classifications

Library of Congress
PR1870.A1 W7 2008

The Physical Object

Pagination
xxvii, 482 p. ;
Number of pages
482

ID Numbers

Open Library
OL22553319M
ISBN 13
9780199535620
LC Control Number
2008276002
Library Thing
9978
Goodreads
2646459

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History

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December 23, 2011 Edited by WorkBot merge works
December 23, 2011 Edited by WorkBot merge works
August 19, 2010 Edited by IdentifierBot added LibraryThing ID
August 18, 2010 Edited by WorkBot merge works
December 8, 2009 Edited by ImportBot link works